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      What information needs do people with recently diagnosed diabetes mellitus have and what are the associated factors? A cross-sectional study in Germany

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          Abstract

          Objectives

          This study aimed to identify: (1) information needs of people with recently diagnosed type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM); (2) information needs within different subgroups; and (3) factors associated with information needs concerning DM such as current level of information, health-related quality of life or participation preferences.

          Design

          A mixed-method approach combining quantitative and qualitative methods was used. Information needs for different topics and estimated associated factors were described using logistic regression models. Additionally, a qualitative content analysis was performed.

          Setting

          Monocentre study.

          Participants

          Information needs were assessed and analysed in 138 consecutive participants with DM who took part in the German Diabetes Study (54% type 2 diabetes, 64% male, mean age 46.3±12.3 years, known diabetes duration <1 year).

          Results

          Most participants displayed a need for information in all topics provided, especially in diabetes research (86%) and treatment/therapy (80%). Regarding those topics, participants wished for information regarding new treatments that simplify their everyday life. In general, participants preferred topics that focus on the management or handling of DM over topics related to clinical factors of DM, such as causes and complications. A low current level of information and treatment with antihyperglycaemic medication were significantly associated with higher information needs, and diabetes-related comorbidity and higher mental component summary score in the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) with lower information needs.

          Conclusion

          People with recently diagnosed DM display high information needs, which differ according to the current level of information, mode of diabetes treatment, diabetes-related comorbidity and mental component summary score in the SF-36. There appears to be a preference for information, which can help to simplify life with diabetes and for information that corresponds to their level of knowledge. This should be considered in patient information activities.

          Trial registration number

          NCT01055093.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 32

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          The qualitative content analysis process.

          This paper is a description of inductive and deductive content analysis. Content analysis is a method that may be used with either qualitative or quantitative data and in an inductive or deductive way. Qualitative content analysis is commonly used in nursing studies but little has been published on the analysis process and many research books generally only provide a short description of this method. When using content analysis, the aim was to build a model to describe the phenomenon in a conceptual form. Both inductive and deductive analysis processes are represented as three main phases: preparation, organizing and reporting. The preparation phase is similar in both approaches. The concepts are derived from the data in inductive content analysis. Deductive content analysis is used when the structure of analysis is operationalized on the basis of previous knowledge. Inductive content analysis is used in cases where there are no previous studies dealing with the phenomenon or when it is fragmented. A deductive approach is useful if the general aim was to test a previous theory in a different situation or to compare categories at different time periods.
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            A short questionnaire for the measurement of habitual physical activity in epidemiological studies.

            The construct validity and the test-retest reliability of a self-administered questionnaire about habitual physical activity were investigated in young males (n = 139) and females (n = 167) in three age groups (20 to 22, 25 to 27, and 30 to 32 yr) in a Dutch population. By principal components analysis three conceptually meaningful factors were distinguished. They were interpreted as: 1) physical activity at work; 2) sport during leisure time; and 3) physical activity during leisure time excluding sport. Test-retest showed that the reliability of the three indices constructed from these factors was adequate. Further, it was found that level of education was inversely related to the work index, and positively related to the leisure-time index in both sexes. The subjective experience of work load was not related to the work index, but was inversely related to the sport index, and the leisure-time index in both sexes. The lean body mass was positively related the the work index, and the sport index in males, but was not related to the leisure-time index in either sex. These differences in the relationships support the subdivision of habitual physical activity into the three components mentioned above.
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              A Structural Approach to Selection Bias

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                BMJ Open
                BMJ Open
                bmjopen
                bmjopen
                BMJ Open
                BMJ Publishing Group (BMA House, Tavistock Square, London, WC1H 9JR )
                2044-6055
                2018
                31 October 2018
                : 8
                : 10
                Affiliations
                [1 ] departmentInstitute for Health Services Research and Health Economics , German Diabetes Center, Leibniz Center for Diabetes Research at the Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf , Düsseldorf, Germany
                [2 ] departmentInstitute for Health Services Research and Health Economics , Centre for Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf , Düsseldorf, Germany
                [3 ] German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD) , München-Neuherberg, Germany
                [4 ] departmentDepartment for Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, Center for Health Communication and Health Services Research , University Hospital of Bonn , Bonn, Germany
                [5 ] departmentInstitute for Biometrics and Epidemiology , German Diabetes Center, Leibniz Center for Diabetes Research at the Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf , Düsseldorf, Germany
                [6 ] mediStatistica , Neuenrade, Germany
                [7 ] departmentDivision of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Faculty of Medicine , Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf , Düsseldorf, Germany
                [8 ] departmentInstitute for Clinical Diabetology , German Diabetes Center, Leibniz Center for Diabetes Research at the Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf , Düsseldorf, Germany
                Author notes
                [Correspondence to ] Sandra Grobosch; sandra.grobosch@ 123456ddz.uni-duesseldorf.de

                SG and SK shared first authorship.

                [34]

                MR and AI shared senior authorship.

                Article
                bmjopen-2017-017895
                10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017895
                6252653
                30385437
                © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2018. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

                This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

                Product
                Funding
                Funded by: German Federal Ministry of Education and Research;
                Funded by: German Federal Ministry of Health;
                Funded by: Ministry of Culture and Science of the German State of North Rhine-Westphalia;
                Funded by: Research Commission of the Faculty of Medicine of the Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf;
                Categories
                Diabetes and Endocrinology
                Research
                1506
                1843
                Custom metadata
                unlocked

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