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      Two new species of the millipede genus Plusioglyphiulus Silvestri, 1923 from Cambodia (Diplopoda, Spirostreptida)

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          Abstract

          Two new species of Plusioglyphiulus are described from southern Cambodia. Plusioglyphiulus biserratus sp. nov. is clearly distinguished from all congeners by the shape of the telopodites of the posterior gonopods which are distinctly serrate laterally and by the anterior gonopods showing only a pair of single, smooth and curved coxosternal processes. Plusioglyphiulus khmer sp. nov. is distinguished by having most crests on the collum being complete and male legs 1 showing long, prominent, one-segmented telopodites, coupled with the oblong-subtrapeziform, membranous, posterior gonopods with a small bifid process at about a third of the telopodite length. Notes on the variation of Plusioglyphiulus boutini Mauriès, 1970 are also given, including a colour photograph of fresh, live material. A key to all four species of Plusioglyphiulus currently known to occur in Cambodia is also presented.

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          Most cited references 17

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          Limestone Karsts of Southeast Asia: Imperiled Arks of Biodiversity

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            Anamorphosis in millipedes (Diplopoda)-the present state of knowledge with some developmental and phylogenetic considerations

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              Cave Diplopoda of southern China with reference to millipede diversity in Southeast Asia

              Abstract The diversity of Diplopoda in caves of southern China is remarkably high, often 5–6 species per cave, consisting mostly of local endemics and presumed troglobionts. These are evidently biased to just a few lineages, mainly members of the orders Chordeumatida and Callipodida , the families Cambalopsidae ( Spirostreptida ) and Haplodesmidae ( Polydesmida ) or the genera Pacidesmus , Epanerchodus and Glenniea (all Polydesmida , Polydesmidae ), Trichopeltis ( Polydesmida , Cryptodesmidae ), Dexmoxytes ( Polydesmida , Paradoxosomatidae ) and Hyleoglomeris ( Glomerida , Glomeridae ). All these taxa, especially the Paradoxosomatidae and Cambalopsidae (usually amounting to about 60% and 10% of the total species diversity in the Oriental fauna, respectively), are moderately to highly speciose across Southeast Asia, being largely epigean. However, the epigean Diplopoda of southern China are yet badly understudied, since much of the collecting and taxonomic exploration efforts still focus on cavernicoles. The Oriental Region is the only biogeographic realm globally that harbours all 16 orders of Diplopoda , of which 14 have already been encountered in China and/or the immediately adjacent parts of Indochina. Thus, China may actually prove to support no less than 1,000 millipede species of various origins, mainly Oriental and Palaearctic.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Zookeys
                Zookeys
                2
                urn:lsid:arphahub.com:pub:45048D35-BB1D-5CE8-9668-537E44BD4C7E
                urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:91BD42D4-90F1-4B45-9350-EEF175B1727A
                ZooKeys
                Pensoft Publishers
                1313-2989
                1313-2970
                2020
                04 June 2020
                : 938
                : 137-151
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Division of Plant Protection, Faculty of Agricultural Production, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290, Thailand Maejo University Chiang Mai Thailand
                [2 ] Institute for Problems of Ecology and Evolution, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky pr. 33, Moscow 119071, Russia Institute for Problems of Ecology and Evolution, Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow Russia
                [3 ] Inland Fisheries Research and Development Institute (IFReDI) No. 86, Norodom Blvd., PO Box 582, Phnom Penh, Cambodia Inland Fisheries Research and Development Institute Phnom Penh Cambodia
                [4 ] Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 40002, Thailand Khon Kaen University Khon Kaen Thailand
                [5 ] Animal Systematics Research Unit, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand Chulalongkorn University Bangkok Thailand
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Somsak Panha ( somsak.pan@ 123456chula.ac.th ); Sergei Golovatch ( sgolovatch@ 123456yandex.ru )

                Academic editor: D.V. Spiegel

                Article
                51234
                10.3897/zookeys.938.51234
                7289900
                Natdanai Likhitrakarn, Sergei I. Golovatch, Phanara Thach, Samol Chhuoy, Peng Bun Ngor, Ruttapon Srisonchai, Chirasak Sutcharit, Somsak Panha

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Funding
                The Thailand Research Fund
                Categories
                Research Article
                Diplopoda
                Spirostreptida
                Systematics
                Cenozoic
                Asia

                Animal science & Zoology

                cave, diplopod, forest, indochina, key, animalia, spirostreptida, cambalopsidae

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