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      Anti-Inflammatory and Immune Regulatory Actions of Naja naja atra Venom

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          Abstract

          Naja naja atra venom (NNAV) is composed of various proteins, peptides, and enzymes with different biological and pharmacological functions. A number of previous studies have reported that NNAV exerts potent analgesic effects on various animal models of pain. The clinical studies using whole venom or active components have confirmed that NNAV is an effective and safe medicine for treatment of chronic pain. Furthermore, recent studies have demonstrated that NNAV has anti-inflammatory and immune regulatory actions in vitro and in vivo. In this review article, we summarize recent studies of NNAV and its components on inflammation and immunity. The main new findings in NNAV research show that it may enhance innate and humoral immune responses while suppressing T lymphocytes-mediated cellular immunity, thus suggesting that NNAV and its active components may have therapeutic values in the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

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          Most cited references 99

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          Mammalian nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: from structure to function.

          The classical studies of nicotine by Langley at the turn of the 20th century introduced the concept of a "receptive substance," from which the idea of a "receptor" came to light. Subsequent studies aided by the Torpedo electric organ, a rich source of muscle-type nicotinic receptors (nAChRs), and the discovery of alpha-bungarotoxin, a snake toxin that binds pseudo-irreversibly to the muscle nAChR, resulted in the muscle nAChR being the best characterized ligand-gated ion channel hitherto. With the advancement of functional and genetic studies in the late 1980s, the existence of nAChRs in the mammalian brain was confirmed and the realization that the numerous nAChR subtypes contribute to the psychoactive properties of nicotine and other drugs of abuse and to the neuropathology of various diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and schizophrenia, has since emerged. This review provides a comprehensive overview of these findings and the more recent revelations of the impact that the rich diversity in function and expression of this receptor family has on neuronal and nonneuronal cells throughout the body. Despite these numerous developments, our understanding of the contributions of specific neuronal nAChR subtypes to the many facets of physiology throughout the body remains in its infancy.
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            Community-based incidence of acute renal failure.

            There is limited information about the true incidence of acute renal failure (ARF). Most studies could not quantify disease frequency in the general population as they are hospital-based and confounded by variations in threshold and the rate of hospitalization. Earlier studies relied on diagnostic codes to identify non-dialysis requiring ARF. These underestimated disease incidence since the codes have low sensitivity. Here we quantified the incidence of non-dialysis and dialysis-requiring ARF among members of a large integrated health care delivery system - Kaiser Permanente of Northern California. Non-dialysis requiring ARF was identified using changes in inpatient serum creatinine values. Between 1996 and 2003, the incidence of non-dialysis requiring ARF increased from 322.7 to 522.4 whereas that of dialysis-requiring ARF increased from 19.5 to 29.5 per 100,000 person-years. ARF was more common in men and among the elderly, although those aged 80 years or more were less likely to receive acute dialysis treatment. We conclude that the use of serum creatinine measurements to identify cases of non-dialysis requiring ARF resulted in much higher estimates of disease incidence compared with previous studies. Both dialysis-requiring and non-dialysis requiring ARFs are becoming more common. Our data underscore the public health importance of ARF.
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              Epidemiology of acute renal failure: a prospective, multicenter, community-based study. Madrid Acute Renal Failure Study Group.

               J Pascual,  F Liaño (1996)
              There are very limited data on overall epidemiology of ARF. It is crucial to know the incidence, etiology and clinical feature of ARF to promote prevention strategies and to implement adequate resources for the management of this entity. During a nine month period, a collaborative prospective protocol with 98 variables was developed to assess all ARF episodes encountered in the 13 tertiary-care hospitals in Madrid, Spain (covering 4.2 million people of over 14 years of age). ARF was considered when a sudden rise in serum creatinine concentration (SCr) to more than 177 mumol/liter was found in patients with normal renal function, or when the sudden rise (50% or more) was observed in patients with previous mild-to-moderate chronic renal failure (SCr < 264 mumol/liter). Of the 748 cases of ARF studied, 665 episodes presented in inhabitants from the Madrid area. This gives an overall incidence of ARF of 209 cases per million population (p.m.p.; 95% CJ 195 to 223). The incidence of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) was 88 cases p.m.p. (95% CI 79 to 97), prerenal ARF 46 p.m.p (95% CI 40 to 52), acute-onset chronic ARF 29 p.m.p. (95% CI 24 to 34), and obstructive ARF 23 p.m.p. (95% CI 19 to 27). The mean age was 63 +/- 17 years. The most frequent causes of ARF were ATN (45%), prerenal (21%), acute-onset chronic renal failure (12.7%) and obstructive ARF (10%). Renal function was normal at admission in 48% of patients who later developed ARF. Mortality (45%) was much higher than that of the other patients admitted (5.4%, P < 0.001). This real outcome correlated extremely well with the expected outcome calculated through out the severity index of ARF (SI) 0.433 +/- 0.246 (mean +/- SD). In 187 cases, mortality was attributed to underlying disease, thus corrected mortality due to ARF was 26.7%. Dialysis was required in 36% of patients, and was associated with a significantly higher SI of ARF (0.57 +/- 0.23 vs. 0.35 +/- 0.19, P < 0.001) and mortality (65.9 vs. 33.2%, P < 0.001). Mortality in patients hemodialyzed with biocompatible synthetic membranes (N = 50) was similar to that observed with cellulosic ones (N = 84; 66% vs. 59.5%, NS). Mortality was higher in patients with coma, assisted respiration, hypotension, jaundice (all P < 0.001) and oliguria (P < 0.02). This study gives, for the first time, the incidence of all forms of ARF in a developed country. ARF is iatrogenically induced at a high rate by modern medicine. Prevention strategies, particularly in the perioperative period, are needed to decrease its impact.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Toxins (Basel)
                Toxins (Basel)
                toxins
                Toxins
                MDPI
                2072-6651
                28 February 2018
                March 2018
                : 10
                : 3
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, China; wangshuzhi727@ 123456126.com
                [2 ]Hunan Province Cooperative Innovation Center for Molecular Target New Drug Study, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, China
                [3 ]Department of Pharmacology and Laboratory of Aging and Nervous Diseases, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Translational Research and Therapy for Neuro-Psycho-Diseases, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Preventive and Translational Medicine for Geriatric Diseases, College of Pharmaceutical Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, China
                Author notes
                [* ]Correspondence: qinzhenhong@ 123456suda.edu.cn ; Tel./Fax: +86-512-65882071
                Article
                toxins-10-00100
                10.3390/toxins10030100
                5869388
                29495566
                e738f328-56ba-45f0-9034-d63f7b3f7b39
                © 2018 by the authors.

                Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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