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      Phosphorylation of NF-κB and IκB proteins: implications in cancer and inflammation

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      Trends in Biochemical Sciences
      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) is a transcription factor that has crucial roles in inflammation, immunity, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Activation of NF-kappaB mainly occurs via IkappaB kinase (IKK)-mediated phosphorylation of inhibitory molecules, including IkappaBalpha. Optimal induction of NF-kappaB target genes also requires phosphorylation of NF-kappaB proteins, such as p65, within their transactivation domain by a variety of kinases in response to distinct stimuli. Whether, and how, phosphorylation modulates the function of other NF-kappaB and IkappaB proteins, such as B-cell lymphoma 3, remains unclear. The identification and characterization of all the kinases known to phosphorylate NF-kappaB and IkappaB proteins are described here. Because deregulation of NF-kappaB and IkappaB phosphorylations is a hallmark of chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer, newly designed drugs targeting these constitutively activated signalling pathways represent promising therapeutic tools.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Trends in Biochemical Sciences
          Trends in Biochemical Sciences
          Elsevier BV
          09680004
          January 2005
          January 2005
          : 30
          : 1
          : 43-52
          Article
          10.1016/j.tibs.2004.11.009
          15653325
          e7442a14-4539-4449-beb1-4d522de75893
          © 2005

          http://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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