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      14.4% efficiency all-polymer solar cell with broad absorption and low energy loss enabled by a novel polymer acceptor

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          Single-Junction Organic Solar Cell with over 15% Efficiency Using Fused-Ring Acceptor with Electron-Deficient Core

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            Polymer-fullerene composite solar cells.

            Fossil fuel alternatives, such as solar energy, are moving to the forefront in a variety of research fields. Polymer-based organic photovoltaic systems hold the promise for a cost-effective, lightweight solar energy conversion platform, which could benefit from simple solution processing of the active layer. The function of such excitonic solar cells is based on photoinduced electron transfer from a donor to an acceptor. Fullerenes have become the ubiquitous acceptors because of their high electron affinity and ability to transport charge effectively. The most effective solar cells have been made from bicontinuous polymer-fullerene composites, or so-called bulk heterojunctions. The best solar cells currently achieve an efficiency of about 5%, thus significant advances in the fundamental understanding of the complex interplay between the active layer morphology and electronic properties are required if this technology is to find viable application.
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              A high-mobility electron-transporting polymer for printed transistors.

              Printed electronics is a revolutionary technology aimed at unconventional electronic device manufacture on plastic foils, and will probably rely on polymeric semiconductors for organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) fabrication. In addition to having excellent charge-transport characteristics in ambient conditions, such materials must meet other key requirements, such as chemical stability, large solubility in common solvents, and inexpensive solution and/or low-temperature processing. Furthermore, compatibility of both p-channel (hole-transporting) and n-channel (electron-transporting) semiconductors with a single combination of gate dielectric and contact materials is highly desirable to enable powerful complementary circuit technologies, where p- and n-channel OTFTs operate in concert. Polymeric complementary circuits operating in ambient conditions are currently difficult to realize: although excellent p-channel polymers are widely available, the achievement of high-performance n-channel polymers is more challenging. Here we report a highly soluble ( approximately 60 g l(-1)) and printable n-channel polymer exhibiting unprecedented OTFT characteristics (electron mobilities up to approximately 0.45-0.85 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) under ambient conditions in combination with Au contacts and various polymeric dielectrics. Several top-gate OTFTs on plastic substrates were fabricated with the semiconductor-dielectric layers deposited by spin-coating as well as by gravure, flexographic and inkjet printing, demonstrating great processing versatility. Finally, all-printed polymeric complementary inverters (with gain 25-65) have been demonstrated.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Nano Energy
                Nano Energy
                Elsevier BV
                22112855
                June 2020
                June 2020
                : 72
                : 104718
                Article
                10.1016/j.nanoen.2020.104718
                e76704e4-3dd3-47ae-9cbb-5ab167d8760e
                © 2020

                https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

                http://www.elsevier.com/open-access/userlicense/1.0/

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