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      The Role of Growth Hormone in the Regulation of Protein Metabolism with Particular Reference to Conditions of Fasting

      ,

      Hormone Research in Paediatrics

      S. Karger AG

      Growth hormone, IGF-I, Protein dynamics, Tracer, Fasting, Free fatty acids, Insulin

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          Abstract

          Growth hormone (GH) has potent protein anabolic actions, as evidenced by a significant decrease in lean body mass and muscle mass in chronic GH deficiency, and vice versa in patients with acromegaly. Depending on the prevailing physiological conditions and on which tissues and which proteins are under examination, the mechanisms involved include both stimulation of protein synthesis and restriction of protein breakdown. Apart from the possible direct effects of GH on protein dynamics, a number of additional anabolic agents, such as insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I and free fatty acids (FFA), are activated. Some of the most recent studies in the field have demonstrated a decisive role of stimulation of lipolysis and high circulating levels of FFA in orchestrating the maintenance of the protein pool of the body.

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          Most cited references 4

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          Some aspects of the regulation of fuel supply in omnivorous animals.

           H.A. Krebs (1972)
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            Two-Month Treatment of Obese Subjects with the Oral Growth Hormone (GH) Secretagogue MK-677 Increases GH Secretion, Fat-Free Mass, and Energy Expenditure

             J. Svensson (1998)
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              Growth hormone acutely stimulates skeletal muscle but not whole-body protein synthesis in humans.

              In a previous study, a 6-hour local infusion of growth hormone (GH) into the brachial artery of normal subjects stimulated net muscle protein anabolism by augmenting skeletal muscle protein synthesis. In the present study, we examined whether systemically infused GH affects forearm and whole-body protein metabolism. Normal volunteers aged 18 to 24 years (n = 8) were given an 8-hour systemic infusion of 3H-phenylalanine and 14C-leucine. Between 90 and 120 minutes of tracer infusion, basal samples for determination of forearm and whole-body amino acid kinetics were taken. GH was then infused at 0.06 micrograms/kg/min, increasing GH concentration from 2.4 +/- 0.3 to 32 +/- 3 ng/mL. Systemic insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) level increased from 224 +/- 20 to 262 +/- 21 ng/mL (basal v 6-hour, P < .01). By 6 hours, GH suppressed forearm phenylalanine and leucine net release (each P < .05) by increasing 3H-phenylalanine (66%, P < .05) and 14C-leucine (13%, P < .05) extraction or disposal (Rd). Whole-body leucine rate of appearance ([Ra] an index of whole-body proteolysis) and nonoxidative leucine Rd (whole-body protein synthesis) did not change over the course of the GH infusion, whereas oxidative leucine Rd decreased (20%, P < .03). Acute stimulation of muscle but not whole-body protein synthesis by systemically infused GH suggests that muscle protein is acutely and specifically regulated by GH.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                HRE
                Horm Res Paediatr
                10.1159/issn.1663-2818
                Hormone Research in Paediatrics
                S. Karger AG
                978-3-8055-7539-3
                978-3-318-00942-2
                1663-2818
                1663-2826
                2003
                January 2003
                17 November 2004
                : 59
                : Suppl 1
                : 62-68
                Affiliations
                Medical Department M (Endocrinology and Diabetes), Århus Kommunehospital, Århus, Denmark
                Article
                67827 Horm Res 2003;59(suppl 1):62–68
                10.1159/000067827
                12566723
                © 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                References: 110, Pages: 7
                Categories
                Growth Hormone and Metabolism

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