Blog
About

1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Perceived relative social status and cognitive load influence acceptance of unfair offers in the Ultimatum Game

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Participants in the Ultimatum Game will often reject unfair resource allocations at personal cost, reflecting a trade-off between financial gain and maintenance of social standing. Although this rejection behavior is linked to executive control, the exact role of cognitive regulation in relation to status cues is unclear. We propose that the salience of status cues affects how cognitive regulation resolves the conflict between financial gain and social status considerations. Situations that tax executive control by limiting available cognitive resources should increase acceptance rates for unfair offers, particularly when the conflict between economic self-interest and social reputation is high. Here, participants rated their own subjective social status, and then either mentally counted (Load) or ignored (No Load) simultaneously-presented tones while playing two rounds of the Ultimatum Game with an online (sham) “Proposer” of either high or low social status. A logistic regression revealed an interaction of Proposer status with cognitive load. Compared to the No Load group, the Load group showed higher acceptance rates for unfair offers from the high-status Proposer. In contrast, cognitive load did not influence acceptance rates for unfair offers from the low-status Proposer. Additionally, Proposer status interacted with the relative social distance between participant and Proposer. Participants close in social distance to the high-status Proposer were more likely to accept the unfair offer than those farther in social distance, whereas the opposite pattern was observed for offers from the low-status Proposer. Although rejection of unfair offers in the Ultimatum Game has previously been conceptualized as an intuitive response, these results instead suggest it reflects a deliberative strategy, dependent on cognitive resources, to prioritize social standing over short-term financial gain. This study reveals the dynamic interplay of cognitive resources and status concerns within this paradigm, providing new insights into when and why people reject inequitable divisions of resources.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 53

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          ERC: A Theory of Equity, Reciprocity, and Competition

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Self-control in decision-making involves modulation of the vmPFC valuation system.

            Every day, individuals make dozens of choices between an alternative with higher overall value and a more tempting but ultimately inferior option. Optimal decision-making requires self-control. We propose two hypotheses about the neurobiology of self-control: (i) Goal-directed decisions have their basis in a common value signal encoded in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), and (ii) exercising self-control involves the modulation of this value signal by dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to monitor brain activity while dieters engaged in real decisions about food consumption. Activity in vmPFC was correlated with goal values regardless of the amount of self-control. It incorporated both taste and health in self-controllers but only taste in non-self-controllers. Activity in DLPFC increased when subjects exercised self-control and correlated with activity in vmPFC.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              In Search of Homo Economicus: Behavioral Experiments in 15 Small-Scale Societies

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: Formal analysisRole: InvestigationRole: SupervisionRole: VisualizationRole: Writing – original draftRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Data curationRole: InvestigationRole: Project administrationRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Data curationRole: Investigation
                Role: Data curationRole: InvestigationRole: MethodologyRole: Project administrationRole: Software
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Formal analysisRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Formal analysisRole: InvestigationRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: MethodologyRole: ResourcesRole: SoftwareRole: SupervisionRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                PLoS One
                PLoS ONE
                plos
                plosone
                PLoS ONE
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
                1932-6203
                9 January 2020
                2020
                : 15
                : 1
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Department of Psychological Science, Claremont McKenna College, Claremont, California, United States of America
                [2 ] Division of Behavioral & Social Sciences, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, California, United States of America
                [3 ] The Webb Schools, Claremont, California, United States of America
                [4 ] Robert Day School of Economics & Finance, Claremont McKenna College, Claremont, California, United States of America
                Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, ISRAEL
                Author notes

                Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

                Article
                PONE-D-19-24292
                10.1371/journal.pone.0227717
                6952087
                31917806
                © 2020 Harris et al

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Page count
                Figures: 4, Tables: 1, Pages: 18
                Product
                Funding
                The author(s) received no specific funding for this work.
                Categories
                Research Article
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Neuroscience
                Cognitive Science
                Cognitive Psychology
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Psychology
                Cognitive Psychology
                Social Sciences
                Psychology
                Cognitive Psychology
                Social Sciences
                Sociology
                Social Status
                Physical Sciences
                Mathematics
                Applied Mathematics
                Game Theory
                Ultimatum Game
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Psychology
                Behavior
                Social Sciences
                Psychology
                Behavior
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Neuroscience
                Cognitive Science
                Cognition
                Social Sciences
                Economics
                Finance
                Research and Analysis Methods
                Research Design
                Survey Research
                Surveys
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Anatomy
                Brain
                Prefrontal Cortex
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Anatomy
                Brain
                Prefrontal Cortex
                Custom metadata
                All relevant data are within the paper and its Supporting Information files.

                Uncategorized

                Comments

                Comment on this article