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      Plasma and brain pharmacokinetic profile of cannabidiol (CBD), cannabidivarine (CBDV), Δ9-tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) and cannabigerol (CBG) in rats and mice following oral and intraperitoneal administration and CBD action on obsessive–compulsive behaviour

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          Abstract

          Phytocannabinoids are useful therapeutics for multiple applications including treatments of constipation, malaria, rheumatism, alleviation of intraocular pressure, emesis, anxiety and some neurological and neurodegenerative disorders. Consistent with these medicinal properties, extracted cannabinoids have recently gained much interest in research, and some are currently in advanced stages of clinical testing. Other constituents of Cannabis sativa, the hemp plant, however, remain relatively unexplored in vivo. These include cannabidiol (CBD), cannabidivarine (CBDV), Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabivarin (Δ(9)-THCV) and cannabigerol (CBG). We here determined pharmacokinetic profiles of the above phytocannabinoids after acute single-dose intraperitoneal and oral administration in mice and rats. The pharmacodynamic-pharmacokinetic relationship of CBD (120 mg/kg, ip and oral) was further assessed using a marble burying test in mice. All phytocannabinoids readily penetrated the blood-brain barrier and solutol, despite producing moderate behavioural anomalies, led to higher brain penetration than cremophor after oral, but not intraperitoneal exposure. In mice, cremophor-based intraperitoneal administration always attained higher plasma and brain concentrations, independent of substance given. In rats, oral administration offered higher brain concentrations for CBD (120 mg/kg) and CBDV (60 mg/kg), but not for Δ(9)-THCV (30 mg/kg) and CBG (120 mg/kg), for which the intraperitoneal route was more effective. CBD inhibited obsessive-compulsive behaviour in a time-dependent manner matching its pharmacokinetic profile. These data provide important information on the brain and plasma exposure of new phytocannabinoids and guidance for the most efficacious administration route and time points for determination of drug effects under in vivo conditions.

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          Most cited references 65

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          The orphan receptor GPR55 is a novel cannabinoid receptor.

          The endocannabinoid system functions through two well characterized receptor systems, the CB1 and CB2 receptors. Work by a number of groups in recent years has provided evidence that the system is more complicated and additional receptor types should exist to explain ligand activity in a number of physiological processes. Cells transfected with the human cDNA for GPR55 were tested for their ability to bind and to mediate GTPgammaS binding by cannabinoid ligands. Using an antibody and peptide blocking approach, the nature of the G-protein coupling was determined and further demonstrated by measuring activity of downstream signalling pathways. We demonstrate that GPR55 binds to and is activated by the cannabinoid ligand CP55940. In addition endocannabinoids including anandamide and virodhamine activate GTPgammaS binding via GPR55 with nM potencies. Ligands such as cannabidiol and abnormal cannabidiol which exhibit no CB1 or CB2 activity and are believed to function at a novel cannabinoid receptor, also showed activity at GPR55. GPR55 couples to Galpha13 and can mediate activation of rhoA, cdc42 and rac1. These data suggest that GPR55 is a novel cannabinoid receptor, and its ligand profile with respect to CB1 and CB2 described here will permit delineation of its physiological function(s).
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            Isolation, Structure, and Partial Synthesis of an Active Constituent of Hashish

             Y GAONI,  R Mechoulam (1964)
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              Agonistic properties of cannabidiol at 5-HT1a receptors.

              Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major, biologically active, but psycho-inactive component of cannabis. In this cell culture-based report, CBD is shown to displace the agonist, [3H]8-OH-DPAT from the cloned human 5-HT1a receptor in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, the major psychoactive component of cannabis, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) does not displace agonist from the receptor in the same micromolar concentration range. In signal transduction studies, CBD acts as an agonist at the human 5-HT1a receptor as demonstrated in two related approaches. First, CBD increases [35S]GTPgammaS binding in this G protein coupled receptor system, as does the known agonist serotonin. Second, in this GPCR system, that is negatively coupled to cAMP production, both CBD and 5-HT decrease cAMP concentration at similar apparent levels of receptor occupancy, based upon displacement data. Preliminary comparative data is also presented from the cloned rat 5-HT2a receptor suggesting that CBD is active, but less so, relative to the human 5-HT1a receptor, in binding analyses. Overall, these studies demonstrate that CBD is a modest affinity agonist at the human 5-HT1a receptor. Additional work is required to compare CBD's potential at other serotonin receptors and in other species. Finally, the results indicate that cannabidiol may have interesting and useful potential beyond the realm of cannabinoid receptors.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Psychopharmacology
                Psychopharmacology
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0033-3158
                1432-2072
                February 2012
                July 28 2011
                February 2012
                : 219
                : 3
                : 859-873
                Article
                10.1007/s00213-011-2415-0
                21796370
                © 2012

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