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      The optimal timing of surgical ligation of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm or very-low-birth-weight infants : A systematic review and meta-analysis

      , MD, PhD a , b , , MD c , d , , MD c , d , , MD, PhD c , d , , MD, PhD c , d , , MD, PhD b , c , d ,

      Medicine

      Wolters Kluwer Health

      meta-analysis, patent ductus arteriosus, preterm infants, surgical ligation

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          Abstract

          Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text

          Abstract

          Background:

          Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a particularly common problem in preterm infants. Although surgical ligation is rarely performed in many contemporary neonatal intensive care units, it remains a necessary treatment option for preterm infants with a large hemodynamically significant PDA under strict clinical criteria, and it can reduce mortality in preterm infants. However, the optimal timing of surgical ligation is still controversial. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the mortality and morbidity of early and late surgical ligation of PDA in preterm or very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants.

          Methods:

          This review was registered in the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO) (CRD42019133686). We searched the databases of PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform up to May 2019.

          Results:

          This review included 6 retrospective studies involving 397 premature or VLBW infants with PDA. Pooled analysis showed that compared with the late ligation group, the early ligation group had a lower fraction of inspired oxygen (F iO 2) at 24 hours postoperatively (mean difference [MD] −6.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] −9.45 to −3.22), fewer intubation days (MD −19.69, 95% CI −29.31 to −10.07), earlier date of full oral feeding (MD −22.98, 95% CI −28.63 to −17.34) and heavier body weight at 36 weeks of conceptional age (MD 232.08, 95% CI 57.28 to 406.88). No significant difference in mortality or other complications was found between the early and late groups.

          Conclusion:

          Our meta-analysis implies that compared with late surgical ligation, early ligation might have a better respiratory outcome and nutritional status for PDA in preterm or VLBW infants. There was no difference in mortality or postoperative complications between early and late ligation. A randomized prospective clinical trial with a possible large sample size is urgently needed to reinvestigate this conclusion.

          PROSPERO registration number:

          CRD42019133686.

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          Most cited references 29

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          Newcastle-Ottawa Scale: comparing reviewers’ to authors’ assessments

          Background Lack of appropriate reporting of methodological details has previously been shown to distort risk of bias assessments in randomized controlled trials. The same might be true for observational studies. The goal of this study was to compare the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) assessment for risk of bias between reviewers and authors of cohort studies included in a published systematic review on risk factors for severe outcomes in patients infected with influenza. Methods Cohort studies included in the systematic review and published between 2008–2011 were included. The corresponding or first authors completed a survey covering all NOS items. Results were compared with the NOS assessment applied by reviewers of the systematic review. Inter-rater reliability was calculated using kappa (K) statistics. Results Authors of 65/182 (36%) studies completed the survey. The overall NOS score was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in the reviewers’ assessment (median = 6; interquartile range [IQR] 6–6) compared with those by authors (median = 5, IQR 4–6). Inter-rater reliability by item ranged from slight (K = 0.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = −0.19, 0.48) to poor (K = −0.06, 95% CI = −0.22, 0.10). Reliability for the overall score was poor (K = −0.004, 95% CI = −0.11, 0.11). Conclusions Differences in assessment and low agreement between reviewers and authors suggest the need to contact authors for information not published in studies when applying the NOS in systematic reviews.
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            Necrotising enterocolitis.

             B Stoll,  W. Lin (2006)
            Necrotising enterocolitis is one of the most common gastrointestinal emergencies in newborn infants. Here we review the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and pathophysiology of the disease, as well as strategies for diagnosis, management, and prevention. Necrotising enterocolitis is one of the most devastating and unpredictable diseases affecting premature infants. Despite decades of research, its pathogenesis remains unclear; diagnosis can be difficult; and treatment is challenging. We will need to improve our understanding of intestinal defences in premature infants, dietary and bacterial factors, and genetic effects that could predispose infants to necrotising enterocolitis before we can develop new strategies for prevention and treatment.
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              Treatment of patent ductus arteriosus and neonatal mortality/morbidities: adjustment for treatment selection bias.

              To examine the association between treatment for patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and neonatal outcomes in preterm infants, after adjustment for treatment selection bias.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Medicine (Baltimore)
                Medicine (Baltimore)
                MEDI
                Medicine
                Wolters Kluwer Health
                0025-7974
                1536-5964
                February 2020
                28 February 2020
                : 99
                : 9
                Affiliations
                [a ]Department of Medical Ultrasound, West China Hospital, Sichuan University
                [b ]West China School of Medicine, Sichuan University
                [c ]Department of Pediatrics
                [d ]Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Women and Children's Diseases and Birth Defects, West China Second University Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
                Author notes
                []Correspondence: Chaomin Wan, West China School of Medicine, Sichuan University/Department of Pediatrics, West China Second University Hospital, Sichuan University, No. 20, Section 3, South Renmin Road, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan, China (e-mail: wcm0220@ 123456126.com ).
                Article
                MD-D-19-06123 19356
                10.1097/MD.0000000000019356
                7478603
                32118777
                Copyright © 2020 the Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License 4.0 (CCBY-NC), where it is permissible to download, share, remix, transform, and buildup the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0

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