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      Antiviral Activity and Mode of Action of Propolis Extracts and Selected Compounds

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          Abstract

          Aqueous and ethanol extracts of propolis were analysed phytochemically and examined for their antiviral activity in vitro. Different polyphenols, flavonoids and phenylcarboxylic acids were identified as major constituents. The antiviral effect of propolis extracts and selected constituents, e.g. caffeic acid (1), p-coumaric acid (2), benzoic acid (3), galangin (4), pinocembrin (5) and chrysin (6) against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was analysed in cell culture. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of aqueous and ethanol propolis extracts for HSV-1 plaque formation was determined at 0.0004% and 0.000035%, respectively. Both propolis extracts exhibited high levels of antiviral activity against HSV-1 in viral suspension tests, plaque formation was significantly reduced by >98%. In order to determine the mode of antiviral action of propolis, the extracts were added at different times during the viral infection cycle. Both propolis extracts exhibited high anti-HSV-1 activity when the viruses were pretreated with these drugs prior to infection. Among the analysed compounds, only galangin and chrysin displayed some antiviral activity. However, the extracts containing many different components exhibited significantly higher antiherpetic effects as well as higher selectivity indices than single isolated constituents. Propolis extracts might be suitable for topical application against herpes infection.

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          Most cited references 35

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          Antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activity of propolis of different geographic origin.

          Propolis samples from different geographic origins were investigated for their antibacterial (against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli), antifungal (against Candida albicans) and antiviral (against Avian influenza virus) activities. All samples were active against the fungal and Gram-positive bacterial test strains, and most showed antiviral activity. The activities of all samples were similar in spite of the differences in their chemical composition. In samples from the temperate zone, flavonoids and esters of phenolic acids are known to be responsible for the above mentioned activities of bee glue; tropical samples did not contain such substances but showed similar activities. Obviously, in different samples, different substance combinations are essential for the biological activity of the bee glue. It seems that propolis has general pharmacological value as a natural mixture and not as a source of new powerful antimicrobial, antifungal and antiviral compounds.
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            Age-specific prevalence of infection with herpes simplex virus types 2 and 1: a global review.

            Information on age- and sex-specific prevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 2 and 1 infections is essential to optimize genital herpes control strategies, which increase in importance because accumulating data indicate that HSV-2 infection may increase acquisition and transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. This review summarizes data from peer-reviewed publications of type-specific HSV seroepidemiologic surveys. HSV-2 prevalence is, in general, highest in Africa and the Americas, lower in western and southern Europe than in northern Europe and North America, and lowest in Asia. HSV-2 and -1 prevalence, overall and by age, varies markedly by country, region within country, and population subgroup. Age-specific HSV-2 prevalence is usually higher in women than men and in populations with higher risk sexual behavior. HSV-2 prevalence has increased in the United States but national data from other countries are unavailable. HSV-1 infection is acquired during childhood and adolescence and is markedly more widespread than HSV-2 infection. Further studies are needed in many geographic areas.
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              Recent progress in pharmacological research of propolis.

              Propolis is a resinous hive product collected by honeybees from various plant sources. It is a popular folk medicine possessing a broad spectrum of biological activities. It has also been used as a health drink in various Asian, European and American countries. Several groups of researchers have focused their attention on the biological activity of propolis and its active principles. Many scientific articles are published every year in different international journals related to the pharmacological properties of propolis. This review article compiles recent findings (since 1995) on the pharmacological properties of propolis focusing on its antihepatotoxic, antitumour, antioxidative, antimicrobial and antiinflammatory properties. The possible mechanism of action of propolis as well as the active compounds are discussed. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Phytotherapy Research
                Phytother. Res.
                Wiley
                0951418X
                January 2010
                January 2010
                May 27 2009
                : 24
                : S1
                : S20-S28
                Article
                10.1002/ptr.2868
                19472427
                © 2009
                Product
                Self URI (article page): http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ptr.2868

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