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      Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: Terminology, Classification, and Natural History

      research-article
      Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Monographs
      Oxford University Press

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          Abstract

          Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) refers to breast epithelial cells that have become “cancerous” but still reside in their normal place in the ducts and lobules. In this setting, cancerous means that there is an abnormal increase in the growth of the epithelial cells, which accumulate within and greatly expand the ducts and lobules. DCIS is a nonlethal type of cancer because it stays in its normal place. However, DCIS is very important because it is the immediate precursor of invasive breast cancers, which are potentially lethal. This article provides a general overview of DCIS, including historical perspective, methods of classification, current perspective, and future goals.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr
          jncimono
          jncmon
          Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Monographs
          Oxford University Press
          1052-6773
          1745-6614
          October 2010
          : 2010
          : 41 , 2009 National Institutes of Health State-of-the-Science Meeting on Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: Management and Diagnosis
          : 134-138
          Affiliations
          Affiliation of author: Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO
          Author notes
          Correspondence to: D. Craig Allred, MD, Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Ave, Campus Box 8118, St Louis, MO 63110 (e-mail: dcallred@ 123456path.wustl.edu ).
          Article
          PMC5161057 PMC5161057 5161057
          10.1093/jncimonographs/lgq035
          5161057
          20956817
          e830b112-b21b-4f61-9926-9ed6df434c4c
          © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press.
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