0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Development of Glycine-Accumulating Neurons in Retinal Transplants

      Ophthalmologica

      S. Karger AG

      Retinal transplants, Development, GLYT1, Glycine

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Previous studies have shown that the fetal retina not only survives transplantation but also continues to develop and differentiate in the host eye. Several structural and functional proteins have been demonstrated in the transplanted retinas, and the presence of such proteins has been taken as evidence for the capability of retinal transplants to function. Glycine is an important inhibitory neurotransmitter and is found in a large number of the retinal neurons. Uptake of glycine rather than de novo synthesis is the main source of glycine in glycinergic neurons. The present study examined whether glycine-accumulating neurons develop normally in rabbit retina transplants. Embryonic day (E) 15 rabbit retinas were transplanted into the eyes of adult rabbits of the same strain. Transplants were allowed to survive for various times so that the grafts attained the equivalent ages of (donor age + survival time) E 19, 22 and 29 and postnatal days (PN) 2, 5, 9, 12, 19 and 58. On formaldehyde-fixed cryostat sections of these transplants, glycine-accumulating neurons were demonstrated by immunohistochemistry by using an antibody against one of the glycine transporters: GLYT1. Immunoreactivity was first detected 2 days before birth and increased with age until it reached its mature level at PN 19. The immunoreactivity was found in cells belonging to the inner retinal layers, and in plexiform layers of the transplant equivalent to the normal inner and the outer plexiform layers. In places these cells integrated well with similar cells in the host. In the host retina, the immunoreactivity was found in proximal cell layers of the inner nuclear layer, in certain bipolar cells, and in the inner and the outer plexiform layers. The immunoreactivity was preserved even in the degenerated retina overlying the retinal graft. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that glycine-accumulating neurons develop, integrate and survive in retinal transplants.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 8

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Fiber and synaptic connections between embryonic retinal transplants and host retina.

          The aim of this study was to investigate (a) whether embryonic retinal transplants can sprout fibers into a lesioned adult host retina and (b) if these fibers established synaptic connections with the host. Embryonic rat (E16-22) or human (9-13 weeks) retinal cells were transplanted to adult rats. Normal Long-Evans rats received rat transplants. The hosts for human transplants were athymic nude rats. After varying survival times (3 to 11 months), animals were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde (sometimes with added 0.1% glutaraldehyde). Glass microneedles, coated with DiI (a carbocyanine dye) were placed into the transplants which were then stored at room temperature in 2% paraformaldehyde for 3-15 months. This filled the cells that had processes in the area where the needle had been placed. Gelatin-embedded eyecups were cut on a vibratome. DiI-labeled transplant cells exhibited fiber outgrowth into the host retina. After photoconversion of the dye to an electron-dense precipitate, these neuronal processes could be followed with better resolution than with fluorescence. Occasionally, host cells could also be labeled by DiI placed into the graft, indicating fiber ingrowth of host fibers into the transplants. Selected photoconverted sections were embedded for electron microscopy. Synapses could be found along transplant processes that had grown into the host inner plexiform layer. These results indicate that neuronal fibers originating from embryonic retinal transplants form synapses in the host retina.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Development of Cell Markers in Subretinal Rabbit Retinal Transplants

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Neuronal markers in rat retinal grafts

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                OPH
                Ophthalmologica
                10.1159/issn.0030-3755
                Ophthalmologica
                S. Karger AG
                0030-3755
                1423-0267
                2000
                August 2000
                07 June 2000
                : 214
                : 4
                : 264-270
                Affiliations
                Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital of Lund, Sweden
                Article
                27502 Ophthalmologica 2000;214:264–270
                10.1159/000027502
                10859509
                © 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 2, References: 41, Pages: 7
                Categories
                Original Paper · Travail original · Originalarbeit

                Vision sciences, Ophthalmology & Optometry, Pathology

                Glycine, GLYT1, Development, Retinal transplants

                Comments

                Comment on this article