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      A synthesis of biological invasion hypotheses associated with the introduction–naturalisation–invasion continuum

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          The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants

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            A General Hypothesis of Species Diversity

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              Hybridization and speciation.

              Hybridization has many and varied impacts on the process of speciation. Hybridization may slow or reverse differentiation by allowing gene flow and recombination. It may accelerate speciation via adaptive introgression or cause near-instantaneous speciation by allopolyploidization. It may have multiple effects at different stages and in different spatial contexts within a single speciation event. We offer a perspective on the context and evolutionary significance of hybridization during speciation, highlighting issues of current interest and debate. In secondary contact zones, it is uncertain if barriers to gene flow will be strengthened or broken down due to recombination and gene flow. Theory and empirical evidence suggest the latter is more likely, except within and around strongly selected genomic regions. Hybridization may contribute to speciation through the formation of new hybrid taxa, whereas introgression of a few loci may promote adaptive divergence and so facilitate speciation. Gene regulatory networks, epigenetic effects and the evolution of selfish genetic material in the genome suggest that the Dobzhansky-Muller model of hybrid incompatibilities requires a broader interpretation. Finally, although the incidence of reinforcement remains uncertain, this and other interactions in areas of sympatry may have knock-on effects on speciation both within and outside regions of hybridization. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.
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                Author and article information

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                Journal
                Oikos
                Oikos
                Wiley
                0030-1299
                1600-0706
                May 2023
                January 27 2023
                May 2023
                : 2023
                : 5
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Univ. of Rennes, CNRS, ECOBIO (Ecosystèmes, Biodiversité, Evolution), UMR 6553 Rennes France
                [2 ] Univ. de Picardie Jules Verne, UMR 7058 CNRS EDYSAN Amiens Cedex 1 France
                [3 ] Univ. Lille, CNRS, Inserm, CHU Lille, Inst. Pasteur de Lille, U1019 – UMR 9017 – CIIL – Center for Infection and Immunity of Lille Lille France
                [4 ] CBGP, INRAE, CIRAD, IRD, Montpellier Institut Agro, Univ. Montpellier Montpellier France
                [5 ] Inst. Méditerranéen de Biodiversité et d'Ecologie Marine et Continentale (IMBE), UMR: Aix Marseille Univ., Avignon Université, CNRS, IRD France
                [6 ] Inst. de Recherche pour la Conservation des zones Humides Méditerranéennes Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc Arles France
                [7 ] Univ. de Poitiers, UMR CNRS 7267 EBI‐Ecologie et Biologie des Interactions, équipe EES Poitiers Cedex 09 France
                [8 ] Normandie Univ., UNIROUEN, INRAE, USC ECODIV Rouen France
                [9 ] ISEM, Univ. Montpellier, CNRS, EPHE, IRD Montpellier France
                [10 ] ANSES – Agence Nationale de Sécurité Sanitaire de l'Alimentation, de l'Environnement et du Travail, Laboratoire de la Santé des Végétaux – Unité de Nématologie Le Rheu France
                [11 ] INRAE, UR629 Écologie des Forêts Méditerranéennes, Centre de Recherche Provence‐Alpes‐Côte d'Azur Avignon France
                [12 ] UMR 5558 CNRS – Univ. Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive, Bât. Gregor Mendel Villeurbanne Cedex France
                [13 ] Ecological Modelling, Faculty of Biology, Univ. of Duisburg‐Essen Essen Germany
                [14 ] Leibniz Inst. of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) Berlin Germany
                [15 ] Technical Univ. of Munich, Restoration Ecology Freising Germany
                [16 ] Centre for Invasion Biology, Dept. Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch University Stellenbosch South Africa
                [17 ] Inst. of Botany, Czech Academy of Sciences Průhonice Czech Republic
                [18 ] Inst. Universitaire de France Paris Cedex 05 France
                Article
                10.1111/oik.09645
                e96e70a9-8c20-4c21-9378-cffa243f4991
                © 2023

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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