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      Optimisation of aqueous extraction conditions for the recovery of phenolic compounds and antioxidants from lemon pomace

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          Most cited references21

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          Comparison of ABTS, DPPH, FRAP, and ORAC assays for estimating antioxidant activity from guava fruit extracts

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            Box-Behnken design: an alternative for the optimization of analytical methods.

            The present paper describes fundamentals, advantages and limitations of the Box-Behnken design (BBD) for the optimization of analytical methods. It establishes also a comparison between this design and composite central, three-level full factorial and Doehlert designs. A detailed study on factors and responses involved during the optimization of analytical systems is also presented. Functions developed for calculation of multiple responses are discussed, including the desirability function, which was proposed by Derringer and Suich in 1980. Concept and evaluation of robustness of analytical methods are also discussed. Finally, descriptions of applications of this technique for optimization of analytical methods are presented.
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              Is Open Access

              Techniques for Analysis of Plant Phenolic Compounds

              Phenolic compounds are well-known phytochemicals found in all plants. They consist of simple phenols, benzoic and cinnamic acid, coumarins, tannins, lignins, lignans and flavonoids. Substantial developments in research focused on the extraction, identification and quantification of phenolic compounds as medicinal and/or dietary molecules have occurred over the last 25 years. Organic solvent extraction is the main method used to extract phenolics. Chemical procedures are used to detect the presence of total phenolics, while spectrophotometric and chromatographic techniques are utilized to identify and quantify individual phenolic compounds. This review addresses the application of different methodologies utilized in the analysis of phenolic compounds in plant-based products, including recent technical developments in the quantification of phenolics.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                International Journal of Food Science & Technology
                Int J Food Sci Technol
                Wiley
                09505423
                September 2016
                September 2016
                July 17 2016
                : 51
                : 9
                : 2009-2018
                Affiliations
                [1 ]School of Environmental and Life Sciences; The University of Newcastle; PO Box 127 Ourimbah NSW 2258 Australia
                [2 ]NSW Department of Primary Industries; Locked Bag 26 Gosford NSW 2250 Australia
                [3 ]Division of Food and Drink School of Science, Engineering and Technology; University of Abertay; Dundee DD1 1HG UK
                Article
                10.1111/ijfs.13168
                e9910cef-a7ba-4b9b-baf1-f1e25e2b0a99
                © 2016

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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