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      Follow-up study on urinary type IV collagen in patients with early stage diabetic nephropathy

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          Structural-functional relationships in diabetic nephropathy.

          Renal biopsies in 45 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) were examined by semiquantitative light microscopy and quantitative electron microscopic stereologic morphometry. In these 14 males and 31 females, aged 13-52 yr, who had had IDDM for 2.5-29 yr there was no strong relationship between either glomerular basement membrane (GBM) thickness or mesangial expansion and duration of IDDM. There was only a weak relationship between the thickness of the GBM and expansion of the mesangium. Thus, GBM thickening and mesangial expansion in IDDM occur at rates that often differ from one another and that vary greatly among patients. The clinical manifestations of diabetic nephropathy, albuminuria, hypertension, and decreased glomerular filtration rate related poorly or not at all to GBM thickening. In contrast, all light and electron microscopic measures of mesangial expansion were strongly related to the clinical manifestations of diabetic nephropathy, although in the absence of these clinical findings, it was not possible to predict the severity of any of the diabetic glomerular lesions. Mesangial expansion had strong inverse correlations with capillary filtering surface area density. It is hypothesized that mesangial expansion could lead to glomerular functional deterioration in IDDM by restricting the glomerular capillary vasculature and its filtering surface. However, capillary closure, glomerular sclerosis, and interstitial fibrosis could also contribute to the clinical manifestations of this disorder.
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            3,3′,5,5′-Tetramethylbenzidine as an Ames Test Negative Chromogen for Horse-Radish Peroxidase in Enzyme-Immunoassay

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              Polyantigenic expansion of basement membrane constituents in diabetic nephropathy.

              The immunohistopathology of the intrinsic basement membrane-associated antigens were examined in diabetic nephropathy. In early and moderate stages of disease there was polyantigenic expansion of all the intrinsic components of mesangium, glomerular basement membrane (GBM), and tubular basement membrane (TBM) assessed by polyclonal antisera to collagen types IV and V, laminin, and by monoclonal antibodies to type IV collagen and fibronectin and to four other intrinsic components of normal renal extracellular matrices (MBM10, 11, 12, and 15). In the mesangium the first intrinsic antigens to increase were fibronectin and type V collagen. In late stages of disease, there was a diminution in the mesangium of all of these antigens with the exception of type V collagen, which persisted. Additionally, antigens appeared in the mesangium, recognized by MBM11 and MBM15, which are normally present in fetal but not adult mesangial regions. Similarly, in the GBM in late stages of disease, there was a decrease in all of the antigens, except for a persistence of the antigen recognized by MBM15. However, in TBM all of the antigens assessed increased in early, moderate, and severe disease. These studies document the complexity of polyantigenic alterations in the development of diabetic nephropathy.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Clinical Laboratory Analysis
                J. Clin. Lab. Anal.
                Wiley
                0887-8013
                1098-2825
                1998
                1998
                : 12
                : 6
                : 378-382
                Article
                10.1002/(SICI)1098-2825(1998)12:6<378::AID-JCLA8>3.0.CO;2-J
                © 1998

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