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      Impact of the Invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bug in North America and Europe: History, Biology, Ecology, and Management.

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          Abstract

          The brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys (Stål), is an invasive pentatomid introduced from Asia into the United States, Canada, multiple European countries, and Chile. In 2010, BMSB populations in the mid-Atlantic United States reached outbreak levels and subsequent feeding severely damaged tree fruit as well as other crops. Significant nuisance issues from adults overwintering inside homes were common. BMSB is a highly polyphagous species with a strong dispersal capacity and high reproductive output, potentially enabling its spread and success in invaded regions. A greater understanding of BMSB biology and ecology and its natural enemies, the identification of the male-produced aggregation pheromone, and the recognition that BMSB disperses into crops from adjacent wooded habitats have led to the development of behavior-based integrated pest management (IPM) tactics. Much is still unknown about BMSB, and continued long-term collaborative studies are necessary to refine crop-specific IPM programs and enhance biological control across invaded landscapes.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Annu. Rev. Entomol.
          Annual review of entomology
          Annual Reviews
          1545-4487
          0066-4170
          Jan 07 2018
          : 63
          Affiliations
          [1 ] USDA-ARS, Appalachian Fruit Research Station, Kearneysville, West Virginia 25430, USA; email: tracy.leskey@ars.usda.gov.
          [2 ] Department of Entomology, Rutgers University, Bridgeton, New Jersey 08302, USA; email: nielsen@aesop.rutgers.edu.
          Article
          10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043226
          29068708
          e9ee9869-96f7-43b7-b234-5bc32f39b356
          History

          IPM,biological control,invasive,pheromone,stink bug,Halyomorpha halys

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