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      Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI)-a simple practical measure for routine clinical use

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      Clinical and Experimental Dermatology

      Wiley

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          Abstract

          A simple practical questionnaire technique for routine clinical use, the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) is described. One hundred and twenty patients with different skin diseases were asked about the impact of their disease and its treatment on their lives; a questionnaire, the DLQI, was developed based on their answers. The DLQI was then completed by 200 consecutive new patients attending a dermatology clinic. This study confirmed that atopic eczema, psoriasis and generalized pruritus have a greater impact on quality of life than acne, basal cell carcinomas and viral warts. The DLQI was also completed by 100 healthy volunteers; their mean score was very low (1.6%, s.d. 3.5) compared with the mean score for the dermatology patients (24.2%, s.d. 20.9). The reliability of the DLQI was examined in 53 patients using a 1 week test-retest method and reliability was found to be high (gamma s = 0.99).

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          Most cited references 8

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          Validation of Sickness Impact Profile and Psoriasis Disability Index in Psoriasis.

          A prospective cross-sectional questionnaire study of 32 patients with psoriasis was carried out in order to validate the use of the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) in psoriasis and compare its sensitivity with the Psoriasis Disability Index (PDI). Overall PDI scores, but not overall SIP scores, correlated well with PASI scores (P less than 0.05). There was good correlation between the PDI and overall SIP scores (P less than 0.01). Psychosocial factors are more severely impaired than physical activities in patients with psoriasis. It is now possible to directly compare the disability experienced by psoriatic patients with that experienced by patients suffering from other systemic diseases, using the SIP. The PDI is an appropriate method to give a rapid overall measure of psoriasis disability.
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            Skin disease and handicap: An analysis of the impact of skin conditions

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              The Sickness Impact Profile: reliability of a health status measure.

              This report describes the results of research conducted on the reliability of the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP). The SIP is a questionnaire instrument designed to measure sickness-related behavioral dysfunction and is being developed for use as an outcome measure in the evaluation of health care. The test-retest reliability of the SIP in terms of several reliability measures was investigated using different interviewers, forms, administration procedures, and a variety of subjects who differed in terms of type and severity of dysfunction. The results provided evidence for the feasibility of collecting reliable data using the SIP under these various conditions. In addition, subject variability in relation to reliability is discussed.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Clinical and Experimental Dermatology
                Clin Exp Dermatol
                Wiley
                0307-6938
                1365-2230
                May 1994
                May 1994
                : 19
                : 3
                : 210-216
                Article
                10.1111/j.1365-2230.1994.tb01167.x
                8033378
                © 1994

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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