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      Intestinal Neuronal Dysplasia Type B: An Updated Review of a Problematic Diagnosis

      1 , 1

      Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine

      Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

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          Glial cells in the mouse enteric nervous system can undergo neurogenesis in response to injury.

          The enteric nervous system (ENS) in mammals forms from neural crest cells during embryogenesis and early postnatal life. Nevertheless, multipotent progenitors of the ENS can be identified in the adult intestine using clonal cultures and in vivo transplantation assays. The identity of these neurogenic precursors in the adult gut and their relationship to the embryonic progenitors of the ENS are currently unknown. Using genetic fate mapping, we here demonstrate that mouse neural crest cells marked by SRY box-containing gene 10 (Sox10) generate the neuronal and glial lineages of enteric ganglia. Most neurons originated from progenitors residing in the gut during mid-gestation. Afterward, enteric neurogenesis was reduced, and it ceased between 1 and 3 months of postnatal life. Sox10-expressing cells present in the myenteric plexus of adult mice expressed glial markers, and we found no evidence that these cells participated in neurogenesis under steady-state conditions. However, they retained neurogenic potential, as they were capable of generating neurons with characteristics of enteric neurons in culture. Furthermore, enteric glia gave rise to neurons in vivo in response to chemical injury to the enteric ganglia. Our results indicate that despite the absence of constitutive neurogenesis in the adult gut, enteric glia maintain limited neurogenic potential, which can be activated by tissue dissociation or injury.
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            The London Classification of gastrointestinal neuromuscular pathology: report on behalf of the Gastro 2009 International Working Group.

            Guidelines on histopathological techniques and reporting for adult and paediatric gastrointestinal neuromuscular pathology have been produced recently by an international working group (IWG). These addressed the important but relatively neglected areas of histopathological practice of the general pathologist, including suction rectal biopsy and full-thickness intestinal tissue. Recommendations were presented for the indications, safe acquisition of tissue, histological techniques, reporting and referral of such histological material. Consensual processes undertaken by the IWG and following established guideline decision group methodologies. This report presents a contemporary and structured classification of gastrointestinal neuromuscular pathology based on defined histopathological criteria derived from the existing guidelines. In recognition of its origins and first presentation in London at the World Congress of Gastroenterology 2009, this has been named 'The London Classification'. The implementation of this classification should allow some diagnostic standardisation, but should necessarily be viewed as a starting point for future modification as new data become available.
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              The developmental etiology and pathogenesis of Hirschsprung disease.

              The enteric nervous system is the part of the autonomic nervous system that directly controls the gastrointestinal tract. Derived from a multipotent, migratory cell population called the neural crest, a complete enteric nervous system is necessary for proper gut function. Disorders that arise as a consequence of defective neural crest cell development are termed neurocristopathies. One such disorder is Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), also known as congenital megacolon or intestinal aganglionosis. HSCR occurs in 1/5000 live births and typically presents with the inability to pass meconium, along with abdominal distension and discomfort that usually requires surgical resection of the aganglionic bowel. This disorder is characterized by a congenital absence of neurons in a portion of the intestinal tract, usually the distal colon, because of a disruption of normal neural crest cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, survival, and/or apoptosis. The inheritance of HSCR disease is complex, often non-Mendelian, and characterized by variable penetrance. Extensive research has identified a number of key genes that regulate neural crest cell development in the pathogenesis of HSCR including RET, GDNF, GFRα1, NRTN, EDNRB, ET3, ZFHX1B, PHOX2b, SOX10, and SHH. However, mutations in these genes account for only ∼50% of the known cases of HSCR. Thus, other genetic mutations and combinations of genetic mutations and modifiers likely contribute to the etiology and pathogenesis of HSCR. The aims of this review are to summarize the HSCR phenotype, diagnosis, and treatment options; to discuss the major genetic causes and the mechanisms by which they disrupt normal enteric neural crest cell development; and to explore new pathways that may contribute to HSCR pathogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine
                Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine
                Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
                0003-9985
                1543-2165
                February 2019
                February 2019
                : 143
                : 2
                : 235-243
                Affiliations
                [1 ]From the Department of Laboratories, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington (Dr Kapur); the Department of Pathology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle (Dr Kapur); and the Department of Pathology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Dr Reyes-Mugica).
                Article
                10.5858/arpa.2017-0524-RA
                © 2019

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