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      D-galactose effectiveness in modeling aging and therapeutic antioxidant treatment in mice.

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          Abstract

          Accumulating evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress play major roles in aging. Chronic administration of D-galactose has been reported to cause deterioration of cognitive and motor skills that are similar to symptoms of aging and, therefore, is regarded as a model of accelerated aging. Because enhancing endogenous antioxidants is now widely regarded as an attractive therapy for conditions associated with mitochondrial oxidative stress, in the present study the effects of α-lipoic acid, L-carnitine, and PMX-500F on D-galactose treated mice were tested. Female mice were injected with (100 mg/kg) D-(+)-galactose for 6 weeks and some groups were treated with a daily dose of α-lipoic acid (5 mg/kg), L-carnitine (3.9 mg/kg), PMX-500F (11.9 mg/kg), or the vehicle (0.1 M Tris, pH 7.4). Control mice were treated with physiological saline. An accelerating Rota-Rod, open field test, and Y-maze test were performed, and serum lactate concentrations were analyzed. These analyses did not identify impairment in motor coordination, open-field activity, or spatial memory (p > 0.05). Similarly, serum lactate concentrations in D-galactose-treated mice were not elevated when compared to controls (p > 0.05). Treatment with the antioxidant compounds at the given concentrations did not result in any changes in the behavioral parameters tested. In conclusion, results of this study illustrate that chronic, short-term D-galactose treatment may not represent a suitable model for inducing readily detectable age-related neurobehavioral symptoms in mice.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Rejuvenation Res
          Rejuvenation research
          1557-8577
          1549-1684
          Dec 2010
          : 13
          : 6
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Alabama 36849-5112, USA.
          Article
          10.1089/rej.2010.1020
          3034100
          21204654

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