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      True complete left bundle branch block morphology strongly predicts good response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

      , , , , , , , , ,

      EP Europace

      Oxford University Press (OUP)

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          Most cited references 26

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          Cardiac-resynchronization therapy for mild-to-moderate heart failure.

          Cardiac-resynchronization therapy (CRT) benefits patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction and a wide QRS complex. Most of these patients are candidates for an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). We evaluated whether adding CRT to an ICD and optimal medical therapy might reduce mortality and morbidity among such patients. We randomly assigned patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II or III heart failure, a left ventricular ejection fraction of 30% or less, and an intrinsic QRS duration of 120 msec or more or a paced QRS duration of 200 msec or more to receive either an ICD alone or an ICD plus CRT. The primary outcome was death from any cause or hospitalization for heart failure. We followed 1798 patients for a mean of 40 months. The primary outcome occurred in 297 of 894 patients (33.2%) in the ICD-CRT group and 364 of 904 patients (40.3%) in the ICD group (hazard ratio in the ICD-CRT group, 0.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.64 to 0.87; P<0.001). In the ICD-CRT group, 186 patients died, as compared with 236 in the ICD group (hazard ratio, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.62 to 0.91; P = 0.003), and 174 patients were hospitalized for heart failure, as compared with 236 in the ICD group (hazard ratio, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.83; P<0.001). However, at 30 days after device implantation, adverse events had occurred in 124 patients in the ICD-CRT group, as compared with 58 in the ICD group (P<0.001). Among patients with NYHA class II or III heart failure, a wide QRS complex, and left ventricular systolic dysfunction, the addition of CRT to an ICD reduced rates of death and hospitalization for heart failure. This improvement was accompanied by more adverse events. (Funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and Medtronic of Canada; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00251251.).
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            2012 ACCF/AHA/HRS focused update incorporated into the ACCF/AHA/HRS 2008 guidelines for device-based therapy of cardiac rhythm abnormalities: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines and the Heart Rhythm Society.

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              Characterization of left ventricular activation in patients with heart failure and left bundle-branch block.

              Conventional activation mapping in the dilated human left ventricle (LV) with left bundle-branch block (LBBB) morphology is incomplete given the limited number of recording sites that may be collected in a reasonable time and given the lack of precision in marking specific anatomic locations. We studied LV activation sequences in 24 patients with heart failure and LBBB QRS morphology with simultaneous application of 3D contact and noncontact mapping during intrinsic rhythm and asynchronous pacing. Approximately one third of the patients with typical LBBB QRS morphology had normal transseptal activation time and a slightly prolonged or near-normal LV endocardial activation time. A "U-shaped" activation wave front was present in 23 patients because of a line of block that was located anteriorly (n=12), laterally (n=8), and inferiorly (n=3). Patients with a lateral line of block had significantly shorter QRS (P<0.003) and transseptal durations (P<0.001) and a longer distance from the LV breakthrough site to line of block (P<0.03). Functional behavior of the line of block was demonstrated by a change in its location during asynchronous ventricular pacing at different sites and cycle lengths. A U-shaped conduction pattern is imposed on the LV activation sequence by a transmural functional line of block located between the LV septum and the lateral wall with a prolonged activation time. Assessment of functional block is facilitated by noncontact mapping, which may be useful for identifying and targeting specific locations that are optimal for successful cardiac resynchronization therapy.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                EP Europace
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                1532-2092
                1099-5129
                October 2013
                October 01 2013
                March 6 2013
                October 2013
                October 01 2013
                March 6 2013
                : 15
                : 10
                : 1499-1506
                Article
                10.1093/europace/eut049
                © 2013

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