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      MicroRNA-181b inhibits thrombin-mediated endothelial activation and arterial thrombosis by targeting caspase recruitment domain family member 10

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          Abstract

          Thrombogenic and inflammatory mediators, such as thrombin, induce NF-κB-mediated endothelial cell (EC) activation and dysfunction, which contribute to pathogenesis of arterial thrombosis. The role of anti-inflammatory microRNA-181b (miR-181b) on thrombosis remains unknown. Our previous study demonstrated that miR-181b inhibits downstream NF-κB signaling in response to TNF-α. Here, we demonstrate that miR-181b uniquely inhibits upstream NF-κB signaling in response to thrombin. Overexpression of miR-181b inhibited thrombin-induced activation of NF-κB signaling, demonstrated by reduction of phospho-IKK-β, -IκB-α, and p65 nuclear translocation in ECs. MiR-181b also reduced expression of NF-κB target genes VCAM-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, E-selectin, and tissue factor. Mechanistically, miR-181b targets caspase recruitment domain family member 10 (Card10), an adaptor protein that participates in activation of the IKK complex in response to signals transduced from protease-activated receptor-1. miR-181b reduced expression of Card10 mRNA and protein, but not protease-activated receptor-1. 3'-Untranslated region reporter assays, argonaute-2 microribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation studies, and Card10 rescue studies revealed that Card10 is a bona fide direct miR-181b target. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Card10 expression phenocopied effects of miR-181b on NF-κB signaling and targets. Card10 deficiency did not affect TNF-α-induced activation of NF-κB signaling, which suggested stimulus-specific regulation of NF-κB signaling and endothelial responses by miR-181b in ECs. Finally, in response to photochemical injury-induced arterial thrombosis, systemic delivery of miR-181b reduced thrombus formation by 73% in carotid arteries and prolonged time to occlusion by 1.6-fold, effects recapitulated by Card10 small interfering RNA. These data demonstrate that miR-181b and Card10 are important regulators of thrombin-induced EC activation and arterial thrombosis. These studies highlight the relevance of microRNA-dependent targets in response to ligand-specific signaling in ECs.-Lin, J., He, S., Sun, X., Franck, G., Deng, Y., Yang, D., Haemmig, S., Wara, A. K. M., Icli, B., Li, D., Feinberg, M. W. MicroRNA-181b inhibits thrombin-mediated endothelial activation and arterial thrombosis by targeting caspase recruitment domain family member 10.

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          Most cited references 22

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          Thrombin signalling and protease-activated receptors.

          How does the coagulation protease thrombin regulate cellular behaviour? The protease-activated receptors (PARs) provide one answer. In concert with the coagulation cascade, these receptors provide an elegant mechanism linking mechanical information in the form of tissue injury or vascular leakage to cellular responses. Roles for PARs are beginning to emerge in haemostasis and thrombosis, inflammation, and perhaps even blood vessel development.
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            The molecular basis of blood coagulation.

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              Arterial thrombosis--insidious, unpredictable and deadly.

               Lisa Jackson (2010)
              The formation of blood clots--thrombosis--at sites of atherosclerotic plaque rupture is a major clinical problem despite ongoing improvements in antithrombotic therapy. Progress in identifying the pathogenic mechanisms regulating arterial thrombosis has led to the development of newer therapeutics, and there is general anticipation that these treatments will have greater efficacy and improved safety. However, major advances in this field require the identification of specific risk factors for arterial thrombosis in affected individuals and a rethink of the 'one size fits all' approach to antithrombotic therapy.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                The FASEB Journal
                The FASEB Journal
                FASEB
                0892-6638
                1530-6860
                September 2016
                September 2016
                : 30
                : 9
                : 3216-3226
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA;
                [2 ]Department of Cardiology, Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China; and
                [3 ]Department of Cardiology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China
                Article
                10.1096/fj.201500163R
                5001512
                27297585
                © 2016
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