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      Daytime sleepiness predicts future suicidal behavior: a longitudinal study of adolescents

      1 , 2 , 3 , 1 , 1 , 4 , 1 , 1

      Sleep

      Oxford University Press (OUP)

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          Most cited references 33

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          Sleep schedules and daytime functioning in adolescents.

          Sleep and waking behaviors change significantly during the adolescent years. The objective of this study was to describe the relation between adolescents' sleep/wake habits, characteristics of students (age, sex, school), and daytime functioning (mood, school performance, and behavior). A Sleep Habits Survey was administered in homeroom classes to 3,120 high school students at 4 public high schools from 3 Rhode Island school districts. Self-reported total sleep times (school and weekend nights) decreased by 40-50 min across ages 13-19, ps 120 min) reported increased daytime sleepiness, depressive mood, and sleep/wake behavior problems, ps < .05, versus those sleeping longer than 8 hr 15 min with less than 60 min weekend delay. Altogether, most of the adolescents surveyed do not get enough sleep, and their sleep loss interferes with daytime functioning.
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            Youth suicide risk and preventive interventions: a review of the past 10 years.

            To review critically the past 10 years of research on youth suicide. Research literature on youth suicide was reviewed following a systematic search of PsycINFO and Medline. The search for school-based suicide prevention programs was expanded using two education databases: ERIC and Education Full Text. Finally, manual reviews of articles' reference lists identified additional studies. The review focuses on epidemiology, risk factors, prevention strategies, and treatment protocols. There has been a dramatic decrease in the youth suicide rate during the past decade. Although a number of factors have been posited for the decline, one of the more plausible ones appears to be the increase in antidepressants being prescribed for adolescents during this period. Youth psychiatric disorder, a family history of suicide and psychopathology, stressful life events, and access to firearms are key risk factors for youth suicide. Exciting new findings have emerged on the biology of suicide in adults, but, while encouraging, these are yet to be replicated in youths. Promising prevention strategies, including school-based skills training for students, screening for at-risk youths, education of primary care physicians, media education, and lethal-means restriction, need continuing evaluation studies. Dialectical behavior therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and treatment with antidepressants have been identified as promising treatments but have not yet been tested in a randomized clinical trial of youth suicide. While tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of who is at risk for suicide, it is incumbent upon future research efforts to focus on the development and evaluation of empirically based suicide prevention and treatment protocols.
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              Deliberate self harm in adolescents: self report survey in schools in England

               K Hawton (2002)
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Sleep
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                0161-8105
                1550-9109
                February 2019
                February 01 2019
                November 16 2018
                February 2019
                February 01 2019
                November 16 2018
                : 42
                : 2
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Shandong University School of Public Health, Jinan, China
                [2 ]South China Normal University School of Psychology, Guangzhou, China
                [3 ]The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN
                [4 ]Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
                Article
                10.1093/sleep/zsy225
                © 2018

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