Blog
About

14
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Prevalence and Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder Among Children Aged 8 Years — Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network, 11 Sites, United States, 2012

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

          Related collections

          Most cited references 21

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Identification and evaluation of children with autism spectrum disorders.

           C P Johnson,  S Myers (2007)
          Autism spectrum disorders are not rare; many primary care pediatricians care for several children with autism spectrum disorders. Pediatricians play an important role in early recognition of autism spectrum disorders, because they usually are the first point of contact for parents. Parents are now much more aware of the early signs of autism spectrum disorders because of frequent coverage in the media; if their child demonstrates any of the published signs, they will most likely raise their concerns to their child's pediatrician. It is important that pediatricians be able to recognize the signs and symptoms of autism spectrum disorders and have a strategy for assessing them systematically. Pediatricians also must be aware of local resources that can assist in making a definitive diagnosis of, and in managing, autism spectrum disorders. The pediatrician must be familiar with developmental, educational, and community resources as well as medical subspecialty clinics. This clinical report is 1 of 2 documents that replace the original American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement and technical report published in 2001. This report addresses background information, including definition, history, epidemiology, diagnostic criteria, early signs, neuropathologic aspects, and etiologic possibilities in autism spectrum disorders. In addition, this report provides an algorithm to help the pediatrician develop a strategy for early identification of children with autism spectrum disorders. The accompanying clinical report addresses the management of children with autism spectrum disorders and follows this report on page 1162 [available at www.pediatrics.org/cgi/content/full/120/5/1162]. Both clinical reports are complemented by the toolkit titled "Autism: Caring for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Resource Toolkit for Clinicians," which contains screening and surveillance tools, practical forms, tables, and parent handouts to assist the pediatrician in the identification, evaluation, and management of autism spectrum disorders in children.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Prevalence of parent-reported diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder among children in the US, 2007.

            The reported increasing prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attendant health and family impact make monitoring of ASD prevalence a public health priority. The prevalence of parent-reported diagnosis of ASD among US children aged 3 to 17 years was estimated from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health (sample size: 78037). A child was considered to have ASD if a parent/guardian reported that a doctor or other health care provider had ever said that the child had ASD and that the child currently had the condition. The point-prevalence for ASD was calculated for those children meeting both criteria. We examined sociodemographic factors associated with current ASD and with a past (but not current) ASD diagnosis. The health care experiences for children in both ASD groups were explored. The weighted current ASD point-prevalence was 110 per 10,000. We estimate that 673,000 US children have ASD. Odds of having ASD were 4 times as large for boys than girls. Non-Hispanic (NH) black and multiracial children had lower odds of ASD than NH white children. Nearly 40% of those ever diagnosed with ASD did not currently have the condition; NH black children were more likely than NH white children to not have current ASD. Children in both ASD groups were less likely than children without ASD to receive care within a medical home. The observed point-prevalence is higher than previous US estimates. More inclusive survey questions, increased population awareness, and improved screening and identification by providers may partly explain this finding.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Prevalence of Autism in a US Metropolitan Area

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                MMWR. Surveillance Summaries
                MMWR Surveill. Summ.
                Centers for Disease Control MMWR Office
                1546-0738
                1545-8636
                April 01 2016
                April 01 2016
                : 65
                : 3
                : 1-23
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Division of Congenital and Developmental Disorders, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, CDC
                [2 ]University of Utah, Salt Lake City
                [3 ]Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston
                [4 ]Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri
                [5 ]University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
                [6 ]University of Wisconsin–Madison
                [7 ]University of Arizona, Tucson
                [8 ]Johns Hopkins University
                [9 ]University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center
                [10 ]University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock
                [11 ]Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Denver
                [12 ]University of Alabama at Birmingham
                [13 ]Rutgers University–New Jersey Medical School, Newark
                Article
                10.15585/mmwr.ss6503a1
                27031587
                © 2016
                Product

                Comments

                Comment on this article