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      Kin recognition in an annual plant

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          Abstract

          Kin recognition is important in animal social systems. However, though plants often compete with kin, there has been as yet no direct evidence that plants recognize kin in competitive interactions. Here we show in the annual plant Cakile edentula, allocation to roots increased when groups of strangers shared a common pot, but not when groups of siblings shared a pot. Our results demonstrate that plants can discriminate kin in competitive interactions and indicate that the root interactions may provide the cue for kin recognition. Because greater root allocation is argued to increase below-ground competitive ability, the results are consistent with kin selection.

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          Most cited references45

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          The evolution of cooperation.

          Cooperation in organisms, whether bacteria or primates, has been a difficulty for evolutionary theory since Darwin. On the assumption that interactions between pairs of individuals occur on a probabilistic basis, a model is developed based on the concept of an evolutionarily stable strategy in the context of the Prisoner's Dilemma game. Deductions from the model, and the results of a computer tournament show how cooperation based on reciprocity can get started in an asocial world, can thrive while interacting with a wide range of other strategies, and can resist invasion once fully established. Potential applications include specific aspects of territoriality, mating, and disease.
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            BIOMASS ALLOCATION IN PLANTS: ONTOGENY OR OPTIMALITY? A TEST ALONG THREE RESOURCE GRADIENTS

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              Tragedy of the commons as a result of root competition

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Biol Lett
                RSBL
                Biology Letters
                The Royal Society (London )
                1744-9561
                1744-957X
                13 June 2007
                22 August 2007
                : 3
                : 4
                : 435-438
                Affiliations
                Department of Biology, McMaster University 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4K1
                Author notes
                [* ]Author for correspondence ( sdudley@ 123456mcmaster.ca )
                Article
                rsbl20070232
                10.1098/rsbl.2007.0232
                2104794
                17567552
                ec080473-0356-4e20-82df-a048ffb27954
                Copyright © 2007 The Royal Society

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                History
                : 27 April 2007
                : 21 May 2007
                : 18 May 2007
                Categories
                Research Article

                Life sciences
                plant,phenotypic plasticity,kin recognition,root allocation,competition,kin selection
                Life sciences
                plant, phenotypic plasticity, kin recognition, root allocation, competition, kin selection

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