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      You Can Handle It: 3D Printing for Museums

      Advances in Archaeological Practice

      Cambridge University Press (CUP)

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          OVERVIEW

          3D printing is a rapidly developing technology that has been championed as a revolutionary tool for the museums and heritage sector. Prints can provide innovative and engaging haptic experiences with objects in collections that cannot be handled, akin to craft replicas that have traditionally been employed. Large museums now regularly commission prints, yet evidence for the success of their deployment is largely anecdotal. This review considers how 3D prints have been utilized in museum contexts, with a focus on their successes and weaknesses as tools for public engagement.

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          Science in three dimensions: the print revolution.

           Nicola Jones (2012)
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            The Digital Dilemma

             Mary Clarke (2015)
            The long-term care of collected and created data is an ethical obligation in the fields of archaeology and cultural heritage management. With the growing application of digital methodologies in these fields and the complexity of the resulting data, this task has become complicated. Digital data preservation firms have emerged since this methodological shift, but their policies—championing the democratization of academic data—may conflict with the legal obligations dictated by the countries where data originate. Scholars thus face an inevitable choice between two obligations, one ethical and one legal. While the amount of digital data grows and the options for preservation remain fundamentally misaligned with research norms and project workflows, the digital dilemma places the integrity of data at risk of loss. This article addresses this dilemma by evaluating the existing data publication, archiving, and preservation repositories and considering how, as solutions to the digital dilemma, they can be integrated into multiple workflows. I also propose new directions for archaeological associations, suggesting that they should establish a means of evaluation and approval for third-party preservation firms managing the future of academic research prior to their inevitable ubiquity.
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              Archaeological applications of polynomial texture mapping: analysis, conservation and representation

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Advances in Archaeological Practice
                Adv. archaeol. pract.
                Cambridge University Press (CUP)
                2326-3768
                November 2019
                October 22 2019
                November 2019
                : 7
                : 4
                : 443-447
                Article
                10.1017/aap.2019.39
                © 2019

                https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms

                https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms

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