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      Protein Supplementation During or Following a Marathon Run Influences Post-Exercise Recovery

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          Abstract

          The effects of protein supplementation on the ratings of energy/fatigue, muscle soreness [ascending (A) and descending (D) stairs], and serum creatine kinase levels following a marathon run were examined. Variables were compared between recreational male and female runners ingesting carbohydrate + protein (CP) during the run (CP During, n = 8) versus those that were consuming carbohydrate (CHO During, n = 8). In a second study, outcomes were compared between subjects who consumed CP or CHO immediately following exercise [CP Post ( n = 4) versus CHO Post ( n = 4)]. Magnitude-based inferences revealed no meaningful differences between treatments 24 h post-marathon. At 72 h, recovery [Δ( 72 hr-Pre)] was likely improved with CP During versus CHO During, respectively, for Physical Energy (+14 ± 64 vs −74 ± 70 mm), Mental Fatigue (−52 ± 59 vs +1 ± 11 mm), and Soreness -D (+15 ± 9 vs +21 ± 70 mm). In addition, recovery at 72 h was likely-very likely improved with CP Post versus CHO Post for Physical Fatigue, Mental Energy, and Soreness -A. Thus, protein supplementation did not meaningfully alter recovery during the initial 24 h following a marathon. However, ratings of energy/fatigue and muscle soreness were improved over 72 h when CP was consumed during exercise, or immediately following the marathon.

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          Most cited references 28

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          Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage in Humans

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            Carbohydrates for training and competition.

            An athlete's carbohydrate intake can be judged by whether total daily intake and the timing of consumption in relation to exercise maintain adequate carbohydrate substrate for the muscle and central nervous system ("high carbohydrate availability") or whether carbohydrate fuel sources are limiting for the daily exercise programme ("low carbohydrate availability"). Carbohydrate availability is increased by consuming carbohydrate in the hours or days prior to the session, intake during exercise, and refuelling during recovery between sessions. This is important for the competition setting or for high-intensity training where optimal performance is desired. Carbohydrate intake during exercise should be scaled according to the characteristics of the event. During sustained high-intensity sports lasting ~1 h, small amounts of carbohydrate, including even mouth-rinsing, enhance performance via central nervous system effects. While 30-60 g · h(-1) is an appropriate target for sports of longer duration, events >2.5 h may benefit from higher intakes of up to 90 g · h(-1). Products containing special blends of different carbohydrates may maximize absorption of carbohydrate at such high rates. In real life, athletes undertake training sessions with varying carbohydrate availability. Whether implementing additional "train-low" strategies to increase the training adaptation leads to enhanced performance in well-trained individuals is unclear.
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              A spreadsheet for deriving a confidence interval, mechanistic inference and clinical inference from a p value

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nutrients
                Nutrients
                nutrients
                Nutrients
                MDPI
                2072-6643
                10 March 2018
                March 2018
                : 10
                : 3
                Affiliations
                Department of Kinesiology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA 22807, USA; ludennd@ 123456jmu.edu (N.D.L.); Cashrdewitt@ 123456gmail.com (C.R.D.); mgross624@ 123456gmail.com (M.C.G.); dillo2am@ 123456gmail.com (A.D.R.)
                Author notes
                [* ]Correspondence: saundemj@ 123456jmu.edu ; Tel.: +1-540-568-8121
                Article
                nutrients-10-00333
                10.3390/nu10030333
                5872751
                29534444
                © 2018 by the authors.

                Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

                Categories
                Article

                Nutrition & Dietetics

                sports nutrition, carbohydrate, protein, post-exercise recovery

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