Blog
About

56
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Development of a Facebook Addiction Scale.

      Psychological reports

      Behavior, Addictive, diagnosis, psychology, Female, Humans, Internet, Male, Mass Screening, Norway, Personality Inventory, Young Adult, statistics & numerical data, Psychometrics, Reference Values, Reproducibility of Results, Social Networking, Students, Adolescent

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The Bergen Facebook Addiction Scale (BFAS), initially a pool of 18 items, three reflecting each of the six core elements of addiction (salience, mood modification, tolerance, withdrawal, conflict, and relapse), was constructed and administered to 423 students together with several other standardized self-report scales (Addictive Tendencies Scale, Online Sociability Scale, Facebook Attitude Scale, NEO-FFI, BIS/BAS scales, and Sleep questions). That item within each of the six addiction elements with the highest corrected item-total correlation was retained in the final scale. The factor structure of the scale was good (RMSEA = .046, CFI = .99) and coefficient alpha was .83. The 3-week test-retest reliability coefficient was .82. The scores converged with scores for other scales of Facebook activity. Also, they were positively related to Neuroticism and Extraversion, and negatively related to Conscientiousness. High scores on the new scale were associated with delayed bedtimes and rising times.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 33

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          An Updated Paradigm for Scale Development Incorporating Unidimensionality and Its Assessment

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            A ‘components’ model of addiction within a biopsychosocial framework

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              The influence of sleep quality, sleep duration and sleepiness on school performance in children and adolescents: A meta-analytic review.

              Insufficient sleep, poor sleep quality and sleepiness are common problems in children and adolescents being related to learning, memory and school performance. The associations between sleep quality (k=16 studies, N=13,631), sleep duration (k=17 studies, N=15,199), sleepiness (k=17, N=19,530) and school performance were examined in three separate meta-analyses including influential factors (e.g., gender, age, parameter assessment) as moderators. All three sleep variables were significantly but modestly related to school performance. Sleepiness showed the strongest relation to school performance (r=-0.133), followed by sleep quality (r=0.096) and sleep duration (r=0.069). Effect sizes were larger for studies including younger participants which can be explained by dramatic prefrontal cortex changes during (early) adolescence. Concerning the relationship between sleep duration and school performance age effects were even larger in studies that included more boys than in studies that included more girls, demonstrating the importance of differential pubertal development of boys and girls. Longitudinal and experimental studies are recommended in order to gain more insight into the different relationships and to develop programs that can improve school performance by changing individuals' sleep patterns. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                22662404
                10.2466/02.09.18.PR0.110.2.501-517

                Comments

                Comment on this article