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      Important Considerations in Plasmon-Enhanced Electrochemical Conversion at Voltage-Biased Electrodes

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          Abstract

          In this perspective we compare plasmon-enhanced electrochemical conversion (PEEC) with photoelectrochemistry (PEC). PEEC is the oxidation or reduction of a reactant at the illuminated surface of a plasmonic metal (or other conductive material) while a potential bias is applied. PEC uses solar light to generate photoexcited electron-hole pairs to drive an electrochemical reaction at a biased or unbiased semiconductor photoelectrode. The mechanism of photoexcitation of charge carriers is different between PEEC and PEC. Here we explore how this difference affects the response of PEEC and PEC systems to changes in light, temperature, and surface morphology of the photoelectrode.

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          Abstract

          Catalysis; Theoretical Photochemistry; Engineering

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          Most cited references 40

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          Electrochemical photolysis of water at a semiconductor electrode.

           A. Fujishima,  K Honda (1972)
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            Photo-electrochemical hydrogen generation from water using solar energy. Materials-related aspects

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              Photochemical and photoelectrochemical reduction of CO2.

              The recent literature on photochemical and photoelectrochemical reductions of CO(2) is reviewed. The different methods of achieving light absorption, electron-hole separation, and electrochemical reduction of CO(2) are considered. Energy gap matching for reduction of CO(2) to different products, including CO, formic acid, and methanol, is used to identify the most promising systems. Different approaches to lowering overpotentials and achieving high chemical selectivities by employing catalysts are described and compared.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                iScience
                iScience
                iScience
                Elsevier
                2589-0042
                14 February 2020
                27 March 2020
                14 February 2020
                : 23
                : 3
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
                [2 ]Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
                [3 ]The Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
                [4 ]Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
                [5 ]Energy Storage and Distributed Resources Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
                Author notes
                []Corresponding author jjurban@ 123456lbl.gov
                [6]

                These authors contributed equally

                [7]

                Present address: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830, USA

                Article
                S2589-0042(20)30095-X 100911
                10.1016/j.isci.2020.100911
                7047194
                32113155

                This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

                Categories
                Review

                engineering, catalysis, theoretical photochemistry

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