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      Interplay of inertia and deformability on rheological properties of a suspension of capsules

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      Journal of Fluid Mechanics

      Cambridge University Press (CUP)

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          Abstract

          The interplay of inertia and deformability has a substantial impact on the transport of soft particles suspended in a fluid. However, to date a thorough understanding of these systems is still missing, and only a limited number of experimental and theoretical studies are available. We combine the finite-element, immersed-boundary and lattice-Boltzmann methods to simulate three-dimensional suspensions of soft particles subjected to planar Poiseuille flow at finite Reynolds numbers. Our findings confirm that the particle deformation and inclination increase when inertia is present. We observe that the Segré–Silberberg effect is suppressed with respect to the particle deformability. Depending on the deformability and strength of inertial effects, inward or outward lateral migration of the particles takes place. In particular, for increasing Reynolds numbers and strongly deformable particles, a hitherto unreported distinct flow focusing effect emerges, which is accompanied by a non-monotonic behaviour of the apparent suspension viscosity and thickness of the particle-free layer close to the channel walls. This effect can be explained by the behaviour of a single particle and the change of the particle collision mechanism when both deformability and inertia effects are relevant.

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          Elastic Properties of Lipid Bilayers: Theory and Possible Experiments

           W Helfrich (1973)
          A theory of the elasticity of lipid bilayers is proposed. Three types of strain, i. e. stretching, tilt and curvature, are distinguished and the associated stresses are identified. It is argued that in the case of vesicles (= closed bilayer films) the only elasticity controlling nonspherical shapes is that of curvature. Euler-Lagrange equations are derived for the shape in magnetic fields and under excess outside pressure. It is shown that magnetic fields can deform spherical vesicles into ellipsoids of revolution. Under excess outside pressure the spherical shape becomes unstable at a certain threshold pressure. Both effects can be influenced by a spontaneous curvature of the bilayer. Some possible experiments to determine the elastic properties are also discussed
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            The immersed boundary method

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              Inertial microfluidics.

              Despite the common wisdom that inertia does not contribute to microfluidic phenomena, recent work has shown a variety of useful effects that depend on fluid inertia for applications in enhanced mixing, particle separation, and bioparticle focusing. Due to the robust, fault-tolerant physical effects employed and high rates of operation, inertial microfluidic systems are poised to have a critical impact on high-throughput separation applications in environmental cleanup and physiological fluids processing, as well as bioparticle focusing applications in clinical diagnostics. In this review I will discuss the recent accelerated progress in developing prototype inertial microfluidic systems for a variety of applications and attempt to clarify the fundamental fluid dynamic effects that are being exploited. Finally, since this a nascent area of research, I will suggest some future promising directions exploiting fluid inertia on the microscale.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Fluid Mechanics
                J. Fluid Mech.
                Cambridge University Press (CUP)
                0022-1120
                1469-7645
                July 25 2014
                June 27 2014
                July 25 2014
                : 751
                : 725-745
                Article
                10.1017/jfm.2014.315
                © 2014

                https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms

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