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      Individual quality and personality: bolder males are less fecund in the hermit crab Pagurus bernhardus

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      Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

      The Royal Society

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          Most cited references 52

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          Prior distributions for variance parameters in hierarchical models (comment on article by Browne and Draper)

           Andrew Gelman (2006)
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            Are animal personality traits linked to life-history productivity?

            Animal personality traits such as boldness, activity and aggressiveness have been described for many animal species. However, why some individuals are consistently bolder or more active than others, for example, is currently obscure. Given that life-history tradeoffs are common and known to promote inter-individual differences in behavior, we suggest that consistent individual differences in animal personality traits can be favored when those traits contribute to consistent individual differences in productivity (growth and/or fecundity). A survey of empirical studies indicates that boldness, activity and/or aggressiveness are positively related to food intake rates, productivity and other life-history traits in a wide range of taxa. Our conceptual framework sets the stage for a closer look at relationships between personality traits and life-history traits in animals.
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              Growth-mortality tradeoffs and 'personality traits' in animals.

              Consistent individual differences in boldness, reactivity, aggressiveness, and other 'personality traits' in animals are stable within individuals but vary across individuals, for reasons which are currently obscure. Here, I suggest that consistent individual differences in growth rates encourage consistent individual differences in behavior patterns that contribute to growth-mortality tradeoffs. This hypothesis predicts that behavior patterns that increase both growth and mortality rates (e.g. foraging under predation risk, aggressive defense of feeding territories) will be positively correlated with one another across individuals, that selection for high growth rates will increase mean levels of potentially risky behavior across populations, and that within populations, faster-growing individuals will take more risks in foraging contexts than slower-growing individuals. Tentative empirical support for these predictions suggests that a growth-mortality perspective may help explain some of the consistent individual differences in behavioral traits that have been reported in fish, amphibians, reptiles, and other animals with indeterminate growth.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
                Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
                The Royal Society
                0962-8452
                1471-2954
                February 11 2015
                February 11 2015
                : 282
                : 1803
                : 20142492
                Article
                10.1098/rspb.2014.2492
                © 2015

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