0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Modulation of Prohormone Convertase 2 in Spinal Cord during Gestation and Hormone-Simulated Pregnancy

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Gestation as well as its hormonal simulation (HSP) is characterized by an enhanced spinal dynorphin/ĸ-opioid antinociception. This antinociception is accompanied by decreased content of dynorphin precursor intermediates and increased content of mature dynorphin peptides (1–17 and 1–8) in the lumbar spinal region. This suggests that augmented processing of spinal dynorphin precursor intermediates is an adaptive mechanism used by dynorphin neurons to meet increased synthetic demands necessitated by increased dynorphin neurotransmission. Prohormone convertase (PC) 1 and 2 represent major secretory granule proteolytic processing activities capable of converting neuroendocrine and neurotransmitter peptide (dynorphin) precursor intermediates to their mature, biologically active products. Accordingly, the current investigation was undertaken to assess their potential relevance to peptidergic (dynorphin) neuronal functional plasticity in vivo. In order to evaluate a molecular biological parameter of PC2 synthesis, a solution hybridization assay was developed with which to quantify changes in the spinal lumbar content of its mRNA. This study demonstrates that during gestation and HSP, lumbar PC2 protein content, but not that of PC1, is augmented. The increase in lumbar PC2 during HSP indicates that the pregnancy blood concentration profile of 17β-estradiol and progesterone is a predominant facet of the pregnant condition responsible for its modulation during this condition. In contrast to the elevated content of lumbar PC2 protein, levels of PC2 mRNA in the lumbar cord of pregnant or HSP rats were essentially unchanged. This indicates that increased transcriptional activity is not, necessarily, a prerequisite for increased PC2 protein content to be manifest. These observations suggest positive modulation of PC2 to be a critical component of the mechanism(s) by which spinal dynorphin neurons adapt to the demand-induced increased production of mature dynorphin peptides.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 14

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Single-step method of RNA isolation by acid guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform extraction.

          A new method of total RNA isolation by a single extraction with an acid guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform mixture is described. The method provides a pure preparation of undegraded RNA in high yield and can be completed within 4 h. It is particularly useful for processing large numbers of samples and for isolation of RNA from minute quantities of cells or tissue samples.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Post-translational proteolysis in polypeptide hormone biosynthesis.

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              The family of subtilisin/kexin like pro-protein and pro-hormone convertases: Divergent or shared functions

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                NEN
                Neuroendocrinology
                10.1159/issn.0028-3835
                Neuroendocrinology
                S. Karger AG
                0028-3835
                1423-0194
                1999
                October 1999
                14 October 1999
                : 70
                : 4
                : 268-279
                Affiliations
                aDepartment of Biochemistry, State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn, N.Y., and bUSDA ARS, NPA, Roman K, Hruska US Meat Animal Research Center, Clay Center, Nebr., USA
                Article
                54486 Neuroendocrinology 1999;70:268–279
                10.1159/000054486
                10529622
                © 1999 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 5, Tables: 1, References: 51, Pages: 12
                Categories
                Reproductive Neuroendocrinology

                Comments

                Comment on this article