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      The Neolithization of Siberia and the Russian Far East: radiocarbon evidence

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      Antiquity
      Cambridge University Press (CUP)

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          Abstract

          Results of recent excavations and radiocarbon dating show that several places in Siberia and the Russian Far East, such as the Lower Amur River basin and the Transbaikal, represent independent centres of pottery invention, and all pre-date 10,000 BP. These two areas should be considered among the earliest centres of pottery origins in East Asia and the Old World. The rest of Siberia is characterized by significantly later appearance of Neolithic cultures, between c. 8000 BP and c. 4600–2600 BP.

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          Extended 14C Data Base and Revised CALIB 3.0 14C Age Calibration Program

          The age calibration program, CALIB (Stuiver & Reimer 1986), first made available in 1986 and subsequently modified in 1987 (revision 2.0 and 2.1), has been amended anew. The 1993 program (revision 3.0) incorporates further refinements and a new calibration data set covering nearly 22,000 cal yr (≈18,40014C yr). The new data, and corrections to the previously used data set, derive from a 6-yr (1986–1992) time-scale calibration effort of several laboratories.
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            German Oak and Pine 14C Calibration, 7200–9439 BC

            Radiocarbon calibration data derived from German oak chronologies, ranging back to 7200 BC, have been published in the previous Calibration Issue (Stuiver & Kra 1986). In recent years, the German oak chronology has been extended to 7938 BC (Becker, this issue). For earlier intervals, tree-ring chronologies must be based on pine, because oak re-emigrated to central Europe at the Preboreal/Boreal transition, at about 8000 BC. We have established a 1784-yr pine chronology centered in the Preboreal, and have linked it tentatively to the absolutely dated oak master. We present here calibration data based on this link, for the age range, 7145–9439 BC.
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              High-Precision 14C Measurement of German and Irish Oaks to Show the Natural 14C Variations from 7890 to 5000 BC

              The availability of absolutely (dendrochronologically) dated German oak has allowed the Belfast laboratory to extend its published high-precision14C measurements of Irish oak (Pearsonet al.1986) by 2680 yr. The samples were selected at contiguous 20-yr intervals, following a precedent adopted and considered satisfactory in previous publications. All samples were measured for at least 200,000 counts within the14C channel. The statistical counting error, together with the error on standards, backgrounds and applied corrections, give a realistic precision quoted on each sample of ± 2.5‰ (± 20 yr). This error is considered high-precision for sample ages of 7000–8000 BP.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Antiquity
                Antiquity
                Cambridge University Press (CUP)
                0003-598X
                1745-1744
                June 2000
                January 02 2015
                June 2000
                : 74
                : 284
                : 356-364
                Article
                10.1017/S0003598X00059433
                edcf2ffa-5af1-4e20-823d-c9a6eb3777a1
                © 2000

                https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms


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