Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: found
  • Article: found
Is Open Access

Cancer mortality inequalities in urban areas: a Bayesian small area analysis in Spanish cities

Read this article at

Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Abstract

      After publication of this work [1] it was brought to our attention that the map of Barcelona in Figure two (figure 1 here) was reversed. The final correct Figure is presented here. Figure 1 (Figure two in original manuscript): Cancer mortality (smoothed Standardized Mortality Ratios) by census tract in men (top) and women (bottom) in Barcelona, Madrid, Sevilla, Córdoba and Vigo. We regret any inconvenience that this inaccuracy may have caused.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 44

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Socioeconomic inequalities in health in 22 European countries.

      Comparisons among countries can help to identify opportunities for the reduction of inequalities in health. We compared the magnitude of inequalities in mortality and self-assessed health among 22 countries in all parts of Europe. We obtained data on mortality according to education level and occupational class from census-based mortality studies. Deaths were classified according to cause, including common causes, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer; causes related to smoking; causes related to alcohol use; and causes amenable to medical intervention, such as tuberculosis and hypertension. Data on self-assessed health, smoking, and obesity according to education and income were obtained from health or multipurpose surveys. For each country, the association between socioeconomic status and health outcomes was measured with the use of regression-based inequality indexes. In almost all countries, the rates of death and poorer self-assessments of health were substantially higher in groups of lower socioeconomic status, but the magnitude of the inequalities between groups of higher and lower socioeconomic status was much larger in some countries than in others. Inequalities in mortality were small in some southern European countries and very large in most countries in the eastern and Baltic regions. These variations among countries appeared to be attributable in part to causes of death related to smoking or alcohol use or amenable to medical intervention. The magnitude of inequalities in self-assessed health also varied substantially among countries, but in a different pattern. We observed variation across Europe in the magnitude of inequalities in health associated with socioeconomic status. These inequalities might be reduced by improving educational opportunities, income distribution, health-related behavior, or access to health care. Copyright 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: not found
        • Article: not found

        Bayesian image restoration, with two applications in spatial statistics

          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Estimates of the cancer incidence and mortality in Europe in 2006.

          Monitoring the evolution of the cancer burden in Europe is of great value. Estimates of the cancer burden in Europe have been published for 2004 and estimates are now being presented for cancer incidence and mortality in Europe for 2006. The most recent sources of cancer incidence and mortality data have been collected and projections have been carried out using short-term prediction methods to produce estimated rates for 2006. Additional estimation was required where national incidence data were not available, and the method involved the projection of the aggregations of cancer incidence and mortality data from representative cancer registries. The estimated 2006 rates were applied to the corresponding estimated country population to obtain the best estimates of the cancer incidence and mortality in Europe in 2006. In 2006 in Europe, there were an estimated 3,191,600 cancer cases diagnosed (excluding nonmelanoma skin cancers) and 1,703,000 deaths from cancer. The most common form of cancers was breast cancer (429,900 cases, 13.5% of all cancer cases), followed by colorectal cancers (412,900, 12.9%) and lung cancer (386,300, 12.1%). Lung cancer, with an estimated 334,800 deaths (19.7% of total), was the most common cause of death from cancer, followed by colorectal (207,400 deaths), breast (131,900) and stomach (118,200) cancers. The total number of new cases of cancer in Europe appears to have increased by 300,000 since 2004. With an estimated 3.2 million new cases (53% occurring in men, 47% in women) and 1.7 million deaths (56% in men, 44% in women) each year, cancer remains an important public health problem in Europe and the ageing of the European population will cause these numbers to continue to increase even if age-specific rates remain constant. Evidence-based public health measures exist to reduce the mortality of breast and colorectal cancer while the incidence of lung cancer, and several other forms of cancer, could be diminished by improved tobacco control.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Journal
            10.1186/1476-072X-10-27
            3090312

            http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0

            Public health

            Comments

            Comment on this article