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      Comprehensive analysis of lncRNA expression profiles reveals a novel lncRNA signature to discriminate nonequivalent outcomes in patients with ovarian cancer

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          Abstract

          There is growing evidence of dysregulated long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) serving as potential biomarkers for cancer prognosis. However, systematic efforts of searching for an expression-based lncRNA signature for prognosis prediction in ovarian cancer (OvCa) have not been made yet. Here, we performed comprehensive analysis for lncRNA expression profiles and clinical data of 544 OvCa patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), and identified an eight-lncRNA signature with ability to classify patients of the training cohort into high-risk group showing poor outcome and low-risk group showing significantly improved outcome, which was further validated in the validation cohort and entire TCGA cohort. Multivariate Cox regression analysis and stratified analysis demonstrated that the prognostic value of this signature was independent of other clinicopathological factors. Associating the outcome prediction with BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation revealed a superior prognosis performance both in BRCA1/2-mutated and BRCA1/2 wild-type tumors. Finally, a significantly correlation was found between the lncRNA signature and the complete response rate of chemotherapy, suggesting that this eight-lncRNA signature may be a measure to predict chemotherapy response and identify platinum-resistant patients who might benefit from other more efficacious therapies. With further prospective validation, this eight-lncRNA signature may have important implications for outcome prediction and therapy decisions.

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          Most cited references 86

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          Bioinformatics enrichment tools: paths toward the comprehensive functional analysis of large gene lists

          Functional analysis of large gene lists, derived in most cases from emerging high-throughput genomic, proteomic and bioinformatics scanning approaches, is still a challenging and daunting task. The gene-annotation enrichment analysis is a promising high-throughput strategy that increases the likelihood for investigators to identify biological processes most pertinent to their study. Approximately 68 bioinformatics enrichment tools that are currently available in the community are collected in this survey. Tools are uniquely categorized into three major classes, according to their underlying enrichment algorithms. The comprehensive collections, unique tool classifications and associated questions/issues will provide a more comprehensive and up-to-date view regarding the advantages, pitfalls and recent trends in a simpler tool-class level rather than by a tool-by-tool approach. Thus, the survey will help tool designers/developers and experienced end users understand the underlying algorithms and pertinent details of particular tool categories/tools, enabling them to make the best choices for their particular research interests.
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            Cancer statistics, 2014.

            Each year, the American Cancer Society estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths that will occur in the United States in the current year and compiles the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival. Incidence data were collected by the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries and mortality data were collected by the National Center for Health Statistics. A total of 1,665,540 new cancer cases and 585,720 cancer deaths are projected to occur in the United States in 2014. During the most recent 5 years for which there are data (2006-2010), delay-adjusted cancer incidence rates declined slightly in men (by 0.6% per year) and were stable in women, while cancer death rates decreased by 1.8% per year in men and by 1.4% per year in women. The combined cancer death rate (deaths per 100,000 population) has been continuously declining for 2 decades, from a peak of 215.1 in 1991 to 171.8 in 2010. This 20% decline translates to the avoidance of approximately 1,340,400 cancer deaths (952,700 among men and 387,700 among women) during this time period. The magnitude of the decline in cancer death rates from 1991 to 2010 varies substantially by age, race, and sex, ranging from no decline among white women aged 80 years and older to a 55% decline among black men aged 40 years to 49 years. Notably, black men experienced the largest drop within every 10-year age group. Further progress can be accelerated by applying existing cancer control knowledge across all segments of the population. © 2014 American Cancer Society, Inc.
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              Integrative analysis of complex cancer genomics and clinical profiles using the cBioPortal.

              The cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics (http://cbioportal.org) provides a Web resource for exploring, visualizing, and analyzing multidimensional cancer genomics data. The portal reduces molecular profiling data from cancer tissues and cell lines into readily understandable genetic, epigenetic, gene expression, and proteomic events. The query interface combined with customized data storage enables researchers to interactively explore genetic alterations across samples, genes, and pathways and, when available in the underlying data, to link these to clinical outcomes. The portal provides graphical summaries of gene-level data from multiple platforms, network visualization and analysis, survival analysis, patient-centric queries, and software programmatic access. The intuitive Web interface of the portal makes complex cancer genomics profiles accessible to researchers and clinicians without requiring bioinformatics expertise, thus facilitating biological discoveries. Here, we provide a practical guide to the analysis and visualization features of the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Oncotarget
                Oncotarget
                Oncotarget
                ImpactJ
                Oncotarget
                Impact Journals LLC
                1949-2553
                31 May 2016
                18 April 2016
                : 7
                : 22
                : 32433-32448
                8653
                10.18632/oncotarget.8653
                5078024
                27074572
                Copyright: © 2016 Zhou et al.

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Categories
                Research Paper

                Oncology & Radiotherapy

                ovarian cancer, long non-coding rnas, outcome, brca1/2

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