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      Health care costs in US patients with and without a diagnosis of osteoarthritis

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          Abstract

          Background

          Osteoarthritis is a chronic and costly condition affecting 14% of adults in the US, and has a significant impact on patient quality of life. This retrospective cohort study compared direct health care utilization and costs between patients with osteoarthritis and a matched control group without osteoarthritis.

          Methods

          MarketScan ® databases were used to identify adult patients with an osteoarthritis claim (ICD-9-CM, 715.xx) in 2007, and the date of first diagnosis served as the index. Patients were excluded if they did not have 12 months of continuous health care benefit prior to and following the index date, were aged <18 years, or lacked a second diagnosis code for osteoarthritis between 15 and 365 days pre-index or post-index. Osteoarthritis patients were matched 1:1 to patients without osteoarthritis for age group, gender, geographic region, health plan type, and Medicare eligibility. Multivariate analyses were conducted to assess for differences in utilization and costs, controlling for differences between cohorts.

          Results

          The study sample included 258,237 patients with osteoarthritis and 258,237 matched controls without osteoarthritis. Most patients were women and over 55 years of age. Patients with osteoarthritis had significantly higher pre-index rates of comorbidity than controls. Mean total adjusted direct costs for osteoarthritis patients were more than double those for the control group at US$18,435 (95% confidence interval [CI]: US$18,318–US$18,560) versus US$7494 (95% CI: US$7425–US$7557). Osteoarthritis patients incurred significantly higher inpatient costs at US$6668 (95% CI: US$6587–US$6744) versus US$1756 (95% CI: US$1717–US$1794), outpatient costs at US$7840 (95% CI: US$7786–US$7902) versus US$3675 (95% CI: US$3637–US$3711), and prescription drug costs at US$3213 (95% CI: US$3195–US$3233) versus US$2245 (95% CI: US$2229–US$2262) compared with the controls.

          Conclusion

          The direct health care costs of osteoarthritis patients were over two times higher than those of similar patients without the condition. The primary drivers of the cost difference were comorbidities and inpatient costs.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J Pain Res
          J Pain Res
          Journal of Pain Research
          Dove Medical Press
          1178-7090
          2012
          01 February 2012
          : 5
          : 23-30
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN
          [2 ]Thomson Reuters, Washington, DC
          [3 ]Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA
          Author notes
          Correspondence: Leslie Montejano, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 330, Washington, DC 20008, USA, Tel +1 202 719 7800, Fax +1 202 719 7801, Email leslie.montejano@ 123456thomsonreuters.com
          Article
          jpr-5-023
          10.2147/JPR.S27275
          3273404
          22328832
          © 2012 Le et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd.

          This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited.

          Categories
          Original Research

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