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      Pleomorphic (spindle/giant cell) carcinoma of the lung. A clinicopathologic correlation of 78 cases.

      Lancet
      Adenocarcinoma, pathology, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Carcinoma, mortality, Carcinoma, Giant Cell, Carcinoma, Squamous Cell, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Prognosis, Survival Rate

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          Abstract

          The authors undertook this study to define the clinical and histologic characteristics of spindle and giant cell carcinomas of the lung and the survival and prognostic features of these tumors. Seventy-eight cases of pleomorphic (spindle and/or giant cell) carcinoma of the lung were studied by light microscopy and immunohistochemistry to establish clinical, gross, and histologic parameters. Follow-up information was obtained from contributing physicians and analyzed by statistical means to determine prognostically significant parameters. The patient population consisted of 57 men and 21 women (male to female ratio, 2.7 to 1) between the ages of 35 and 83 years (mean, 62 years). Clinically, 58 patients (80%) presented with symptoms including thoracic pain, cough, and hemoptysis, whereas 14 (18%) were asymptomatic. At the time of diagnosis, 41% of the patients had clinical Stage I lesions, 6% Stage II lesions, 39% Stage III lesions, and 12% Stage IV lesions. Histologically, foci of squamous cell carcinoma were present in 8% of the tumors, large cell carcinoma in 25%, and adenocarcinoma in 45%. The remaining 22% of neoplasms were completely spindle and/or giant cell carcinomas. Spindle and giant cell carcinomas were found together in 38% of the patients. In the 69 patients for whom follow-up information was obtained, 53 (77%) died within 7 days to 6 years after diagnosis, with a 23-month mean survival (median, 10 months) (Kaplan-Meier method). There was a significant shortening of survival for patients with tumor size greater than 5 cm, clinical stage greater than 1, and lymph node involvement. The presence of nodal metastases was the most significant single prognostic factor, whereas the presence of squamous or adenocarcinomatous differentiation did not have an impact on length of survival. The frequency with which spindle and giant cell carcinomas are found together, their frequent association with other histologic subtypes of lung carcinoma, and the similar clinicopathologic features of these tumors suggest that they are best regarded as one type of lung cancer called pleomorphic carcinoma.

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