2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      “Understanding my story”: young person involvement in formulation

      , , ,

      Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice

      Emerald

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Purpose

          The SECURE STAIRS framework has promoted young person involvement as a key feature of innovative service provision. In the North East of England, Secure Children’s Homes (SCHs) have pioneered young person involvement in team formulation. Young people have also led on the development of formulation materials through a young person involvement project. Young people’s attendance at team formulation meetings has become embedded. These service developments have also begun to expand across broader SCHs, Secure Training Centres (STCs) and Young Offender Institutions (YOIs) and reflect the national impact of such pioneering developments. There is a notable lack of research examining the impact of young person involvement in formulation. The purpose of this study is to elucidate this area.

          Design/methodology/approach

          Between April and August 2019, there were 86 staff attendances at formulation meetings where young people were present across two SCHs in the North East of England.

          Findings

          Paired samples t-tests indicated staff-reported significant post-formulation improvements across all domains measured including knowledge [ t(85) = 11.38, p< 0.001]; confidence working with the young person [ t(85) = 5.87, p< 0.001]; motivation [ t(85) = 3.58, p< 0.001]; understanding [ t(85) = 9.03, p< 0.001]; and satisfaction with the treatment plan [ t(85) = 8.63, p< 0.001].

          Research limitations/implications

          Implications of findings are discussed and further developments outlined.

          Practical implications

          Young people attending team formulation is a new and evolving area, and to the best of the authors’ knowledge, there is no existing research evaluating this area. The current findings suggest that staff knowledge, motivation, confidence and satisfaction with the treatment plan is improved following attendance at team formulation where the young person is present and actively participating. Young people’s participation and involvement is central to planning, developing and progressing meaningful provision within children and young people secure provision.

          Social implications

          Involving children and young people in decision-making, service development and evaluation are also key components of ensuring the voice of young people is central in our minds. It also supports empowering the young people we work with. Young people and their journey should always be at the heart of what we do.

          Originality/value

          Young people attending team formulation is a new and evolving area, and to the best of the authors’ knowledge, there is no existing research evaluating this area. This is the first study of its type evaluating formulation directions within the SECURE STAIRS framework.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 38

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Using thematic analysis in psychology

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Getting it right! Enhancing youth involvement in mental health research

            Abstract Background Few studies relating to youth mental health have actively involved young people in the design and conduct of research. Aims This qualitative study explores the perceptions of young people about involving them in mental health research. Method An opportunistic sample of eight young people (aged 14–24 years) from non‐statutory mental health organizations was interviewed. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and inductive thematic analysis was conducted. Results Six key themes emerged reflecting a desire for young people to have the opportunity to actively contribute to every stage of the research process. Meaningful research involvement was perceived as offering opportunities to develop personal skills, contribute to making a difference and ensuring research projects were more relevant. Conclusions Young people with an active interest in mental health promotion demonstrate a desire to be involved in research with training in research methods likely to facilitate this process. Researchers need training on how best to actively and meaningfully involve young people in mental health research.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Children's and Young People's Involvement and Participation in Mental Health Care

               Crispin Day (2008)
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice
                JCRPP
                Emerald
                2056-3841
                2056-3841
                November 02 2020
                November 21 2020
                November 02 2020
                November 21 2020
                : 6
                : 4
                : 297-306
                Article
                10.1108/JCRPP-02-2020-0020
                © 2020

                Comments

                Comment on this article