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      Cryptosporidiosis: an emerging, highly infectious threat.

      review-article
      Emerging Infectious Diseases
      Centers for Disease Control

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          Abstract

          Cryptosporidium parvum, a leading cause of persistent diarrhea in developing countries, is a major threat to the U.S. water supply. Able to infect with as few as 30 microscopic oocysts, Cryptosporidium is found in untreated surface water, as well as in swimming and wade pools, day-care centers, and hospitals. The organism can cause illnesses lasting longer than 1 to 2 weeks in previously healthy persons or indefinitely in immunocompromised patients; furthermore, in young children in developing countries, cryptosporidiosis predisposes to substantially increased diarrheal illnesses. Recent increased awareness of the threat of cryptosporidiosis should improve detection in patients with diarrhea. New methods such as those using polymerase chain reaction may help with detection of Cryptosporidium in water supplies or in asymptomatic carriers. Although treatment is very limited, new approaches that may reduce secretion or enhance repair of the damaged intestinal mucosa are under study.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Emerg Infect Dis
          eid
          Emerging Infectious Diseases
          Centers for Disease Control
          1080-6040
          1080-6059
          Jan-Mar 1997
          : 3
          : 1
          : 51-57
          Affiliations
          Division of Geographic and International Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville 22908, USA.
          Article
          10.3201/eid0301.970106
          2627589
          9126444
          ef00b614-f7d7-4e27-b6a9-7caea5bbf160
          History
          Categories
          Research Article

          Infectious disease & Microbiology
          Infectious disease & Microbiology

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