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      Tandem repeats finder: a program to analyze DNA sequences

      Nucleic Acids Research

      Oxford University Press (OUP)

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          Abstract

          A tandem repeat in DNA is two or more contiguous, approximate copies of a pattern of nucleotides. Tandem repeats have been shown to cause human disease, may play a variety of regulatory and evolutionary roles and are important laboratory and analytic tools. Extensive knowledge about pattern size, copy number, mutational history, etc. for tandem repeats has been limited by the inability to easily detect them in genomic sequence data. In this paper, we present a new algorithm for finding tandem repeats which works without the need to specify either the pattern or pattern size. We model tandem repeats by percent identity and frequency of indels between adjacent pattern copies and use statistically based recognition criteria. We demonstrate the algorithm's speed and its ability to detect tandem repeats that have undergone extensive mutational change by analyzing four sequences: the human frataxin gene, the human beta T cellreceptor locus sequence and two yeast chromosomes. These sequences range in size from 3 kb up to 700 kb. A World Wide Web server interface atc3.biomath.mssm.edu/trf.html has been established for automated use of the program.

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          Most cited references 26

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          A novel gene containing a trinucleotide repeat that is expanded and unstable on Huntington's disease chromosomes

           M. MacDonald (1993)
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            Friedreich's ataxia: autosomal recessive disease caused by an intronic GAA triplet repeat expansion.

            Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive, degenerative disease that involves the central and peripheral nervous systems and the heart. A gene, X25, was identified in the critical region for the FRDA locus on chromosome 9q13. This gene encodes a 210-amino acid protein, frataxin, that has homologs in distant species such as Caenorhabditis elegans and yeast. A few FRDA patients were found to have point mutations in X25, but the majority were homozygous for an unstable GAA trinucleotide expansion in the first X25 intron.
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              Androgen receptor gene mutations in X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

              X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease) is an adult-onset form of motorneuron disease which may be associated with signs of androgen insensitivity. We have now investigated whether the androgen receptor gene on the proximal long arm of the X chromosome is a candidate gene for this disease. In patient samples we found androgen receptor gene mutations with increased size of a polymorphic tandem CAG repeat in the coding region. These amplified repeats were absolutely associated with the disease, being present in 35 unrelated patients and none of 75 controls. They segregated with the disease in 15 families, with no recombination in 61 meioses (the maximum log likelihood ratio (lod score) is 13.2 at a recombination rate of 0). The association is unlikely to be due to linkage disequilibrium, because 11 different disease alleles were observed. We conclude that enlargement of the CAG repeat in the androgen receptor gene is probably the cause of this disorder.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nucleic Acids Research
                Nucleic Acids Research
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                0305-1048
                1362-4962
                January 01 1999
                January 01 1999
                : 27
                : 2
                : 573-580
                Article
                10.1093/nar/27.2.573
                148217
                9862982
                © 1999

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