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      Salinity stress increases the severity of ranavirus epidemics in amphibian populations

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          Abstract

          The stress-induced susceptibility hypothesis, which predicts chronic stress weakens immune defences, was proposed to explain increasing infectious disease-related mass mortality and population declines. Previous work characterized wetland salinization as a chronic stressor to larval amphibian populations. Thus, we combined field observations with experimental exposures quantifying epidemiological parameters to test the role of salinity stress in the occurrence of ranavirus-associated mass mortality events. Despite ubiquitous pathogen presence (94%), populations exposed to salt runoff had slightly more frequent ranavirus related mass mortality events, more lethal infections, and 117-times greater pathogen environmental DNA. Experimental exposure to chronic elevated salinity (0.8–1.6 g l −1 Cl ) reduced tolerance to infection, causing greater mortality at lower doses. We found a strong negative relationship between splenocyte proliferation and corticosterone in ranavirus-infected larvae at a moderate elevation of salinity, supporting glucocorticoid-medicated immunosuppression, but not at high salinity. Salinity alone reduced proliferation further at similar corticosterone levels and infection intensities. Finally, larvae raised in elevated salinity had 10 times more intense infections and shed five times as much virus with similar viral decay rates, suggesting increased transmission. Our findings illustrate how a small change in habitat quality leads to more lethal infections and potentially greater transmission efficiency, increasing the severity of ranavirus epidemics.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
                Proc. R. Soc. B.
                The Royal Society
                0962-8452
                1471-2954
                May 13 2020
                May 06 2020
                May 13 2020
                : 287
                : 1926
                : 20200062
                Affiliations
                [1 ]School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, PO Box 644236, Pullman, WA 99164-4236, USA
                Article
                10.1098/rspb.2020.0062
                © 2020

                https://royalsociety.org/-/media/journals/author/Licence-to-Publish-20062019-final.pdf

                https://royalsociety.org/journals/ethics-policies/data-sharing-mining/

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