16
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Applications of calixarenes in cancer chemotherapy: facts and perspectives

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Research on the therapeutic applications of calixarene derivatives is an emerging area of interest. The anticancer activity of various functionalized calixarenes has been reported by several research groups. Due to their superior geometric shape, calixarenes can accommodate drug molecules by forming inclusion complexes. Controlled release of anticancer drugs by calixarenes might help in targeted chemotherapy. This review summarizes the anticancer potential of the calixarenes and their drug loading properties. The potential use of calixarenes in chemoradiotherapy is also highlighted in brief.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 43

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The present and future role of photodynamic therapy in cancer treatment.

          It is more than 25 years since photodynamic therapy (PDT) was proposed as a useful tool in oncology, but the approach is only now being used more widely in the clinic. The understanding of the biology of PDT has advanced, and efficient, convenient, and inexpensive systems of light delivery are now available. Results from well-controlled, randomised phase III trials are also becoming available, especially for treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer and Barrett's oesophagus, and improved photosensitising drugs are in development. PDT has several potential advantages over surgery and radiotherapy: it is comparatively non-invasive, it can be targeted accurately, repeated doses can be given without the total-dose limitations associated with radiotherapy, and the healing process results in little or no scarring. PDT can usually be done in an outpatient or day-case setting, is convenient for the patient, and has no side-effects. Two photosensitising drugs, porfirmer sodium and temoporfin, have now been approved for systemic administration, and aminolevulinic acid and methyl aminolevulinate have been approved for topical use. Here, we review current use of PDT in oncology and look at its future potential as more selective photosensitising drugs become available.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Photodynamic therapy.

             Q Peng,  M Korbelik,  G Jori (1998)
            Photodynamic therapy involves administration of a tumor-localizing photosensitizing agent, which may require metabolic synthesis (i.e., a prodrug), followed by activation of the agent by light of a specific wavelength. This therapy results in a sequence of photochemical and photobiologic processes that cause irreversible photodamage to tumor tissues. Results from preclinical and clinical studies conducted worldwide over a 25-year period have established photodynamic therapy as a useful treatment approach for some cancers. Since 1993, regulatory approval for photodynamic therapy involving use of a partially purified, commercially available hematoporphyrin derivative compound (Photofrin) in patients with early and advanced stage cancer of the lung, digestive tract, and genitourinary tract has been obtained in Canada, The Netherlands, France, Germany, Japan, and the United States. We have attempted to conduct and present a comprehensive review of this rapidly expanding field. Mechanisms of subcellular and tumor localization of photosensitizing agents, as well as of molecular, cellular, and tumor responses associated with photodynamic therapy, are discussed. Technical issues regarding light dosimetry are also considered.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Antibody targeted drugs as cancer therapeutics.

              Treatment of cancer is a double-edged sword: it should be as aggressive as possible to completely destroy the tumour, but it is precisely this aggressiveness which often causes severe side effects - a reason why some promising therapeutics can not be applied systemically. In addition, therapeutics such as cytokines that physiologically function in a para- or autocrine fashion require a locally enhanced level to exert their effect appropriately. An elegant way to accumulate therapeutic agents at the tumour site is their conjugation/fusion to tumour-specific antibodies. Here, we discuss recent preclinical and clinical data for antibody-drug conjugates and fusion proteins with a special focus on drug components that exert their antitumour effects through normal biological processes.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2015
                02 June 2015
                : 9
                : 2831-2838
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Kulliyyah of Science, International Islamic University Malaysia, Bandar Indera Mahkota, Malaysia
                [2 ]Kulliyyah of Medicine, International Islamic University Malaysia, Bandar Indera Mahkota, Malaysia
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Shafida Abd Hamid, Kulliyyah of Science, International Islamic University Malaysia, Bandar Indera Mahkota, 25200 Kuantan, Pahang, Malaysia, Tel +60 9 570 5120 Fax +60 9 571 6783, Email shafida@ 123456iium.edu.my
                Article
                dddt-9-2831
                10.2147/DDDT.S83213
                4459628
                © 2015 Yousaf et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License

                The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Review

                Pharmacology & Pharmaceutical medicine

                calixarenes, chemotherapy, cancer

                Comments

                Comment on this article