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      The Dark Side of Expressed Humility for Non-humble Leaders: A Conservation of Resources Perspective

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          Abstract

          Although existing studies to date predominately focus on the beneficial effects of leader expressed humility on followers, knowledge about how those behaviors impact the leaders themselves is scarce. Drawing on the conservation of resources theory, we develop and test a model that specifies for whom and how expressing humility has detrimental effects on leaders’ emotional exhaustion and the downstream implications of this effect for leaders’ turnover intentions and work-to-family conflict. Data from a multisource, time-lagged survey of 55 team leaders and 281 followers showed that expressed humility was positively associated with leaders’ emotional exhaustion when Honesty–Humility was low, after controlling for Emotionality, sleep quality, overall job satisfaction, and hindrance stressors. In addition, we found that expressed humility was positively and indirectly related to leaders’ turnover intentions and work-to-family conflict via emotional exhaustion when Honesty–Humility was low. Overall, our research sheds light on why and under what conditions the dark side of humble leader behaviors is going to emerge and take its toll on the leaders themselves. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

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          Most cited references 93

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          Conservation of resources. A new attempt at conceptualizing stress.

           S E Hobfoll (1989)
          Major perspectives concerning stress are presented with the goal of clarifying the nature of what has proved to be a heuristic but vague construct. Current conceptualizations of stress are challenged as being too phenomenological and ambiguous, and consequently, not given to direct empirical testing. Indeed, it is argued that researchers have tended to avoid the problem of defining stress, choosing to study stress without reference to a clear framework. A new stress model called the model of conservation of resources is presented as an alternative. This resource-oriented model is based on the supposition that people strive to retain, project, and build resources and that what is threatening to them is the potential or actual loss of these valued resources. Implications of the model of conservation of resources for new research directions are discussed.
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            Organizational commitment, job satisfaction, and turnover among psychiatric technicians.

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              Practical Issues in Structural Modeling

               P. Bentler,  C Chou (1987)
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Front Psychol
                Front Psychol
                Front. Psychol.
                Frontiers in Psychology
                Frontiers Media S.A.
                1664-1078
                22 August 2019
                2019
                : 10
                Affiliations
                1Fourth Military Medical University , Xi’an, China
                2School of Labor and Human Resources, Renmin University of China , Beijing, China
                Author notes

                Edited by: Ronald H. Humphrey, Lancaster University, United Kingdom

                Reviewed by: Grégoire Bollmann, University of Zurich, Switzerland; Lei Yao, Beijing Normal University, China

                *Correspondence: Zhen Wang, wangz@ 123456ruc.edu.cn

                This article was submitted to Organizational Psychology, a section of the journal Frontiers in Psychology

                Article
                10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01858
                6713993
                Copyright © 2019 Yang, Zhou, Wang, Lin and Luo.

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

                Counts
                Figures: 2, Tables: 2, Equations: 0, References: 98, Pages: 12, Words: 0
                Categories
                Psychology
                Original Research

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