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      Manipulating domain wall chirality by current pulses in Permalloy/Ir nanostrips

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          Abstract

          Using magnetic force microscopy and micromagnetic simulations, we studied the effect of Oersted magnetic fields on the chirality of transverse magnetic domain walls in Fe\(_{20}\)Ni\(_{80}\)/Ir bilayer nanostrips. Applying nanosecond current pulses with a current density of around \(2\times10^{12}\) A/m\(^2\), the chirality of a transverse domain wall could be switched reversibly and reproducibly. These current densities are similar to the ones used for current-induced domain wall motion, indicating that the Oersted field may stabilize the transverse wall chirality during current pulses and prevent domain wall transformations.

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          Current-induced motion and pinning of domain walls in spin-valve nanowires studied by XMCD-PEEM

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            High domain wall velocity at zero magnetic field induced by low current densities in spin-valve nanostripes

            Current-induced magnetic domain wall motion at zero magnetic field is observed in the permalloy layer of a spin-valve-based nanostripe using photoemission electron microscopy. The domain wall movement is hampered by pinning sites, but in between them high domain wall velocities (exceeding 150 m/s) are obtained for current densities well below \(10^{12} \unit{A/m^2}\), suggesting that these trilayer systems are promising for applications in domain wall devices in case of well controlled pinning positions. Vertical spin currents in these structures provide a potential explanation for the increase in domain wall velocity at low current densities.
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              Author and article information

              Journal
              17 December 2013
              Article
              1312.4918

              http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

              Custom metadata
              cond-mat.mtrl-sci
              ccsd

              Condensed matter

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