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      Hepatozooncf.terzii(Sambon & Seligman, 1907) infection in the snakeBoa constrictor constrictorfrom north Brazil: transmission to the mosquitoCulex quinquefasciatusand the lizardTropidurus torquatus

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      Parasite

      EDP Sciences

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          Abstract

          Specimens of Hepatozoon-infected Boa constrictor constrictor were obtained from localities in Pará State, north Brazil. Gametocytes in erythrocytes of the peripheral blood measured 10 x 2.5-16.2 x 3.7 microns. They were similar to those described as Haemogregarina terzii by Sambon & Seligmann (1907) in B. c. constrictor, in that they did not distort the infected erythrocyte, and their dimensions approximated those given by Carini (1947). Lungs and liver of infected snakes contained actively dividing meronts of a single type, and cysts containing two to six cystozoites were also present in the liver. Our initial feeding of Culex quinquefasciatus on infected snakes consistently resulted in a heavy death-rate of the engorged mosquitoes, with only a few surviving till the 9th day post feeding. These contained numerous oocysts which were undivided or in early stages of division. A fifth and final experiment, however, provided a few mosquitoes surviving up to 21 days post infection (dpi), and these contained fully sporulated oocysts measuring 190-200 microns in diameter and containing over 60 sporocysts of 19-30 microns in diameter. The number of sporozoites in each sporocyst was estimated as approximately 50. The nature of the parasite's sporogonic cycle in the mosquito thus justifies inclusion of this haemogregarine in the genus Hepatozoon. Two wild-caught specimens of the lizard Tropidurus torquatus were fed with mosquitoes containing fully developed oocysts (21 dpi). When sacrificed, three months later, large numbers of dizoic, tetrazoic and hexazoic cysts were demonstrated in their livers. Cystozoites released from these cysts were shown to possess a conspicuous refractile body.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Parasite
          Parasite
          EDP Sciences
          1252-607X
          1776-1042
          June 2004
          August 2014
          : 11
          : 2
          : 175-181
          Article
          10.1051/parasite/2004112175
          15224579
          © 2004

          This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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          Self URI (journal page): http://www.parasite-journal.org/

          Parasitology, Life sciences

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