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      Building resilience against biological hazards and pandemics: COVID-19 and its implications for the Sendai Framework

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          Abstract

          2020 has become the year of coping with COVID-19. This year was to be the “super year” for sustainability, a year of strengthening global actions to accelerate the transformations required for achieving the 2030 agenda. We argue that 2020 can and must be a year of both. Thus we call for more utilisation of the health-emergency disaster risk management (Health-EDRM) framework to complement current responses to COVID-19 and the patent risk of similar phenomena in the future. To make our case, we examine current responses to COVID-19 and their implications for the SFDRR. We argue that current mechanisms and strategies for disaster resilience, as outlined in the SFDRR, can enhance responses to epidemics or global pandemics such as COVID-19. In this regard, we make several general and DRR-specific recommendations. These recommendations concern knowledge and science provision in understanding disaster and health-related emergency risks, the extension of disaster risk governance to manage both disaster risks and potential health-emergencies, particularly for humanitarian coordination aspects; and the strengthening of community-level preparedness and response.

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          Most cited references 12

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          Preparing for Critical Infrastructure Breakdowns: The Limits of Crisis Management and the Need for Resilience

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            A social network contagion theory of risk perception.

            Risk perceptions have, to a great extent, been studied exclusively as individual cognitive mechanisms in which individuals collect, process, and form perceptions as atomized units unconnected to a social system. These individual-level theories do not, however, help explain how perception of risk may vary between communities or within a single community. One alternative approach is based on a network theory of contagion. This approach, emerging largely from organizational and community social network studies, suggests that it is the relational aspects of individuals and the resulting networks and self-organizing systems that influence individual perceptions and build "groups or communities of like-minded" individuals. These social units, it is argued, behave as attitude, knowledge, or behavioral structures. The study reported in this article tests one aspect of this theoretical perspective. The central hypothesis proposes the existence of risk perception networks--relational groupings of individuals who share, and perhaps create, similar risk perceptions. To test this idea, data were collected from individuals involved in a community environmental conflict over a hazardous waste site cleanup. The statistical analysis used a matrix of relational social linkages to compare with a matrix of individual risk perceptions The analysis confirmed the hypothesis suggesting that social linkages in communities may play an important role in focusing risk perceptions.
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              Is Open Access

              The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction: Renewing the Global Commitment to People’s Resilience, Health, and Well-being

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Progress in Disaster Science
                The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.
                2590-0617
                2590-0617
                24 March 2020
                April 2020
                24 March 2020
                : 6
                : 100080
                Affiliations
                [a ]Academic Programme Officer, United Nations University-Institute for the Advances Study of Sustainability (UNU-IAS), Japan
                [b ]Integrated Research on Disaster Risk (IRDR), Japan
                [c ]Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University, Japan
                [d ]School of Economic Policy Studies, Rikkyo University, Japan
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding author at: Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University, Japan. shaw@ 123456sfc.keio.ac.jp
                Article
                S2590-0617(20)30017-X 100080
                10.1016/j.pdisas.2020.100080
                7148717
                © 2020 The Authors

                Since January 2020 Elsevier has created a COVID-19 resource centre with free information in English and Mandarin on the novel coronavirus COVID-19. The COVID-19 resource centre is hosted on Elsevier Connect, the company's public news and information website. Elsevier hereby grants permission to make all its COVID-19-related research that is available on the COVID-19 resource centre - including this research content - immediately available in PubMed Central and other publicly funded repositories, such as the WHO COVID database with rights for unrestricted research re-use and analyses in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for free by Elsevier for as long as the COVID-19 resource centre remains active.

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