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      Hierarchical Zeolite Single-Crystal Reactor for Excellent Catalytic Efficiency

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          Most cited references54

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          Selective conversion of syngas to light olefins.

          Although considerable progress has been made in direct synthesis gas (syngas) conversion to light olefins (C2(=)-C4(=)) via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS), the wide product distribution remains a challenge, with a theoretical limit of only 58% for C2-C4 hydrocarbons. We present a process that reaches C2(=)-C4(=) selectivity as high as 80% and C2-C4 94% at carbon monoxide (CO) conversion of 17%. This is enabled by a bifunctional catalyst affording two types of active sites with complementary properties. The partially reduced oxide surface (ZnCrO(x)) activates CO and H2, and C-C coupling is subsequently manipulated within the confined acidic pores of zeolites. No obvious deactivation is observed within 110 hours. Furthermore, this composite catalyst and the process may allow use of coal- and biomass-derived syngas with a low H2/CO ratio.
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            Conversion of Methanol to Hydrocarbons: How Zeolite Cavity and Pore Size Controls Product Selectivity

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              Hierarchical zeolites: enhanced utilisation of microporous crystals in catalysis by advances in materials design.

              The introduction of synthetic zeolites has led to a paradigm shift in catalysis, separations, and adsorption processes, due to their unique properties such as crystallinity, high-surface area, acidity, ion-exchange capacity, and shape-selective character. However, the sole presence of micropores in these materials often imposes intracrystalline diffusion limitations, rendering low utilisation of the zeolite active volume in catalysed reactions. This critical review examines recent advances in the rapidly evolving area of zeolites with improved accessibility and molecular transport. Strategies to enhance catalyst effectiveness essentially comprise the synthesis of zeolites with wide pores and/or with short diffusion length. Available approaches are reviewed according to the principle, versatility, effectiveness, and degree of reality for practical implementation, establishing a firm link between the properties of the resulting materials and the catalytic function. We particularly dwell on the exciting field of hierarchical zeolites, which couple in a single material the catalytic power of micropores and the facilitated access and improved transport consequence of a complementary mesopore network. The carbon templating and desilication routes as examples of bottom-up and top-down methods, respectively, are reviewed in more detail to illustrate the benefits of hierarchical zeolites. Despite encircling the zeolite field, this review stimulates intuition into the design of related porous solids (116 references).
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Matter
                Matter
                Elsevier BV
                25902385
                October 2020
                October 2020
                : 3
                : 4
                : 1226-1245
                Article
                10.1016/j.matt.2020.07.016
                f043f2ae-d4c9-4acb-8fd0-39fbe8a913fd
                © 2020

                https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

                http://www.elsevier.com/open-access/userlicense/1.0/

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