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      The Perseverance of Gender Stereotype

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      Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction Conference

      4 - 6 July 2018

      Gender Bias, Occupational Gender Stereotype, Stereotypes, Implicit Association Test

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          Abstract

          Numerous studies have observed unequal representation of gender stereotypes across different areas. However, some of the studies featured in this body of research were focused on using direct measures of implicit associations to understand how students are influenced by gender stereotypes when deciding their work area. This study demonstrates gender stereotypes and their impact, in particular the impact on the number of women in technical fields (e.g. computer science). We present a within-subject experiment, which investigates implicit and explicit gender stereotypes for two areas (exact sciences, and art and humanities). Our results from this study involving 41 students revealed a predisposition to unconsciously attribute men to exact sciences fields (e.g., computer science) and women to arts and humanities, but consciously we observed that in exact sciences, gender attributions were balanced.

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          Most cited references 18

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          Measuring individual differences in implicit cognition: the implicit association test.

          An implicit association test (IAT) measures differential association of 2 target concepts with an attribute. The 2 concepts appear in a 2-choice task (2-choice task (e.g., flower vs. insect names), and the attribute in a 2nd task (e.g., pleasant vs. unpleasant words for an evaluation attribute). When instructions oblige highly associated categories (e.g., flower + pleasant) to share a response key, performance is faster than when less associated categories (e.g., insect & pleasant) share a key. This performance difference implicitly measures differential association of the 2 concepts with the attribute. In 3 experiments, the IAT was sensitive to (a) near-universal evaluative differences (e.g., flower vs. insect), (b) expected individual differences in evaluative associations (Japanese + pleasant vs. Korean + pleasant for Japanese vs. Korean subjects), and (c) consciously disavowed evaluative differences (Black + pleasant vs. White + pleasant for self-described unprejudiced White subjects).
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            Implicit and Explicit Occupational Gender Stereotypes

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              A Six-Year Longitudinal Study of Undergraduate Women in Engineering and Science*

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2018
                July 2018
                : 1-6
                Affiliations
                FCT, M-ITI

                Portugal
                NOVA Lincs, FCT

                Portugal
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2018.163
                © Tranquada et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of British HCI 2018. Belfast, UK.

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference
                HCI
                32
                Belfast, UK
                4 - 6 July 2018
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction Conference
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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