Blog
About

5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      KPC-2 producing ST101 Klebsiella pneumoniae from bloodstream infection in India

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 20

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          Global Dissemination of Carbapenemase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae: Epidemiology, Genetic Context, Treatment Options, and Detection Methods

          The emergence of carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative pathogens poses a serious threat to public health worldwide. In particular, the increasing prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae is a major source of concern. K. pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPCs) and carbapenemases of the oxacillinase-48 (OXA-48) type have been reported worldwide. New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM) carbapenemases were originally identified in Sweden in 2008 and have spread worldwide rapidly. In this review, we summarize the epidemiology of K. pneumoniae producing three carbapenemases (KPCs, NDMs, and OXA-48-like). Although the prevalence of each resistant strain varies geographically, K. pneumoniae producing KPCs, NDMs, and OXA-48-like carbapenemases have become rapidly disseminated. In addition, we used recently published molecular and genetic studies to analyze the mechanisms by which these three carbapenemases, and major K. pneumoniae clones, such as ST258 and ST11, have become globally prevalent. Because carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae are often resistant to most β-lactam antibiotics and many other non-β-lactam molecules, the therapeutic options available to treat infection with these strains are limited to colistin, polymyxin B, fosfomycin, tigecycline, and selected aminoglycosides. Although, combination therapy has been recommended for the treatment of severe carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae infections, the clinical evidence for this strategy is currently limited, and more accurate randomized controlled trials will be required to establish the most effective treatment regimen. Moreover, because rapid and accurate identification of the carbapenemase type found in K. pneumoniae may be difficult to achieve through phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility tests, novel molecular detection techniques are currently being developed.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Predictors of mortality in patients with bloodstream infections caused by KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and impact of appropriate antimicrobial treatment.

            Bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae (KPC-KP) are associated with high mortality rates. We investigated outcomes, risk factors for mortality and impact of appropriate antimicrobial treatment in patients with BSIs caused by molecularly confirmed KPC-KP. All consecutive patients with KPC-KP BSIs between May 2008 and May 2010 were included in the study and followed-up until their discharge or death. Potential risk factors for infection mortality were examined by a case-control study. Case-patients were those who died from the BSI and control-patients those who survived. Appropriate antimicrobial therapy was defined as treatment with in vitro active antimicrobials for at least 48 h. A total of 53 patients were identified. Overall mortality was 52.8% and infection mortality was 34%. Appropriate antimicrobial therapy was administered to 35 patients; mortality due to infection occurred in 20%. All 20 patients that received combination schemes had favourable infection outcome; in contrast, seven of 15 patients given appropriate monotherapy died (p 0.001). In univariate analysis, risk factors for mortality were age (p <0.001), APACHE II score at admission and infection onset (p <0.001) and severe sepsis (p <0.001), while appropriate antimicrobial treatment (p 0.003), combinations of active antimicrobials (p 0.001), catheter-related bacteraemia (p 0.04), prior surgery (p 0.014) and other therapeutic interventions (p 0.015) were significantly associated with survival. Independent predictors of mortality were age, APACHE II score at infection onset and inappropriate antimicrobial treatment. Among them, appropriate treatment is the only modifiable independent predictor of infection outcome. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2011 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Genetic structures at the origin of acquisition of the beta-lactamase bla KPC gene.

              Genetic structures surrounding the carbapenem-hydrolyzing Ambler class A bla KPC gene were characterized in several KPC-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from the United States, Colombia, and Greece. The bla KPC genes were associated in all cases with transposon-related structures. In the K. pneumoniae YC isolate from the United States, the beta-lactamase bla KPC-2 gene was located on a novel Tn3-based transposon, Tn4401. Tn4401 was 10 kb in size, was delimited by two 39-bp imperfect inverted repeat sequences, and harbored, in addition to the beta-lactamase bla KPC-2 gene, a transposase gene, a resolvase gene, and two novel insertion sequences, ISKpn6 and ISKpn7. Tn4401 has been identified in all isolates. However, two isoforms of this transposon were found: Tn4401a was found in K. pneumoniae YC and K. pneumoniae GR from the United States and Greece, respectively, and differed by a 100-bp deletion, located just upstream of the bla KPC-2 gene, compared to the sequence of Tn4401b, which was found in the Colombian isolates. In all isolates tested, Tn4401 was flanked by a 5-bp target site duplication, the signature of a recent transposition event, and was inserted in different open reading frames located on plasmids that varied in size and nature. Tn4401 is likely at the origin of carbapenem-hydrolyzing beta-lactamase KPC mobilization to plasmids and its further insertion into various-sized plasmids identified in nonclonally related K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa isolates.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Affiliations
                [1 ] 1​Department of Clinical Microbiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India
                [2 ] 2​Department of Infectious Disease, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India
                Journal
                Journal of Medical Microbiology
                Microbiology Society
                0022-2615
                1473-5644
                July 01 2018
                July 01 2018
                : 67
                : 7
                : 927-930
                10.1099/jmm.0.000767
                © 2018

                Comments

                Comment on this article