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      Transgenic plant-derived siRNAs can suppress propagation of influenza virus in mammalian cells.

      Febs Letters

      Animals, Base Sequence, Cell Line, Codon, Dogs, Gene Targeting, Hemagglutination, Influenza A virus, genetics, Orthomyxoviridae Infections, Plants, Genetically Modified, chemistry, RNA Interference, RNA, Messenger, metabolism, RNA, Small Interfering, Rhizobium, Tobacco, Virus Replication

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          Abstract

          As an example of the cost-effective large-scale generation of small-interfering RNA (siRNAs), we have created transgenic tobacco plants that produce siRNAs targeted to the mRNA of the non-structural protein NS1 from the influenza A virus subtype H1N1. We have investigated if these siRNAs, specifically targeted to the 5'-portion of the NS1 transcripts (5mNS1), would suppress viral propagation in mammalian cells. Agroinfiltration of transgenic tobacco with an Agrobacterium strain harboring a 5mNS1-expressing binary vector caused a reduction in 5mNS1 transcripts in the siRNA-accumulating transgenic plants. Further, H1N1 infection of siRNA-transfected mammalian cells resulted in significant suppression of viral replication. These results demonstrate that plant-derived siRNAs can inhibit viral propagation through RNA interference and could potentially be applied in control of viral-borne diseases.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          15556607
          10.1016/j.febslet.2004.10.027

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