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      Burnout Syndrome and associated factors among medical students: a cross-sectional study

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          Abstract

          OBJECTIVES:

          To assess the prevalence and levels of burnout syndrome among medical students at the Universidade Federal de Sergipe-Brazil and to identify associated factors.

          METHODS:

          A cross-sectional study was performed with randomly selected students in 2009. The Maslach Burnout Inventory/Student Survey (MBI-SS) and a structured questionnaire on socio-demographic characteristics, the educational process, and individual aspects were used. Statistical evaluation of multiple variables was performed through backward stepwise logistic regression analysis.

          RESULTS:

          The prevalence of burnout was 10.3% (n = 369). The prevalence was higher among those who did not have confidence in their clinical skills (Odds Ratio–OR = 6.47), those who felt uncomfortable with course activities (OR = 5.76), and those who did not see the coursework as a source of pleasure (OR = 4.68).

          CONCLUSION:

          There was a significant prevalence of burnout among the medical students studied. Three variables, in particular, were associated with burnout and were directly related to the medical education process. Preventive and intervention measures must be adopted, and longitudinal studies should be conducted.

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          Applied Logistic Regression

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            Personal life events and medical student burnout: a multicenter study.

            Burnout, a marker of professional distress prevalent among residents and physicians, has been speculated to originate in medical school. Little is known about burnout in medical students. The authors sought to identify the prevalence of burnout, variation of its prevalence during medical school, and the impact of personal life events on burnout and other types of student distress. All medical students (n = 1,098) attending the three medical schools in Minnesota were surveyed in spring 2004 using validated instruments to assess burnout, quality of life, depression, and alcohol use. Students were also asked about the prevalence of positive and negative personal life events in the previous 12 months. A total of 545 medical students (response rate 50%) completed the survey. Burnout was present in 239 (45%) of medical students. While the frequency of a positive depression screen and at-risk alcohol use decreased among more senior students, the frequency of burnout increased (all p < .03). The number of negative personal life events in the last 12 months also correlated with the risk of burnout (p = .0160). Personal life events demonstrated a stronger relationship to burnout than did year in training on multivariate analysis. Burnout appears common among U.S. medical students and may increase by year of schooling. Despite the notion that burnout is primarily linked to work-related stress, personal life events also demonstrated a strong relationship to professional burnout. The authors' findings suggest both personal and curricular factors are related to burnout among medical students. Efforts to decrease burnout must address both of these elements.
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              Relationships between medical student burnout, empathy, and professionalism climate.

              Medical student burnout is prevalent, and there has been much discussion about burnout and professionalism in medical education and the clinical learning environment. Yet, few studies have attempted to explore relationships between those issues using validated instruments. Medical students were surveyed at the beginning of their fourth year using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy-Student Version, and the Professionalism Climate Instrument. The data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, and Spearman correlation analysis was performed. Scores indicative of higher medical student burnout were associated with lower medical student empathy scores and with lower professionalism climate scores observed in medical students, residents, and faculty. Investigators observed relationships between medical student burnout, empathy, and professionalism climate. These findings may have implications for the design of curriculum interventions to promote student well-being and professionalism.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Clinics (Sao Paulo)
                Clinics (Sao Paulo)
                Clinics
                Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo
                1807-5932
                1980-5322
                June 2012
                : 67
                : 6
                : 573-579
                Affiliations
                [I ]Program of Post-Graduate Medicine and Health at the Federal University of Bahia-Brazil (PPGMS/UFBA), Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at the Federal University of Sergipe-Brazil (UFS), Fellow of Foundation for Advancement International of Medical Education and Research (FAIMER-Br) and CNPQ Scholarship, Salvador/BA, Brazil.
                [II ]Federal University of Sergipe-Brazil (UFS). Aracaju/SE, Brazil.
                Author notes

                Costa EFO was responsible for the conception and design of the manuscript, the acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data, and writing and reviewing the draft of the manuscript. Santos SA was responsible for the acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data and writing and reviewing the draft of the manuscript. Santos ATRA was responsible for the analysis and interpretation of data and for writing and reviewing the draft of the manuscript. Melo EV was responsible for the analysis and interpretation of data and for writing and reviewing the draft of the manuscript. Andrade TM was responsible for the conception and design of the paper, the analysis and interpretation of data, and for writing and reviewing the draft of the manuscript. All authors approved the final version of the manuscript.

                E-mail: edmeaolivacosta@ 123456gmail.com Tel.: 55 79 3211-2307
                Article
                cln_67p573
                10.6061/clinics/2012(06)05
                3370307
                22760894
                f1441eb2-f8d6-4c03-8134-0c812d046942
                Copyright © 2012 Hospital das Clínicas da FMUSP

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                History
                : 14 October 2011
                : 11 December 2011
                : 20 February 2012
                Page count
                Pages: 7
                Categories
                Clinical Science

                Medicine
                mental disorder,medical education,occupational disorder,burnout syndrome,medical students
                Medicine
                mental disorder, medical education, occupational disorder, burnout syndrome, medical students

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